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*** Note: KnowYourInsects.org does its best to include correct identifications of insect photos. It’s always possible that we made a mistake, however, so if you see a misidentification, please contact us and we will correct it. Thanks!

Order Hemiptera: the true bugs — Examples

Families represented below:
Suborder Heteroptera:
Acanaloniidae Acanthosomatidae Belostomatidae Coreidae Corixidae Dinidoridae Gerridae Largidae
Lygaeidae Miridae Nabidae Nepidae Notonectidae Pentatomidae Plataspidae
Pyrrhocoridae Reduviidae Rhopalidae Rhyparochromidae Scutelleridae Tessaratomidae Thyreocoridae Tingidae
Suborder Auchenorrhyncha:
Aphalaridae Aphrophoridae Cercopidae Cicadellidae Cicadidae Clastopteridae Eurybrachidae
Flatidae Fulgoridae Issidae Membracidae Delphacidae Ricaniidae Tropiduchidae
Suborder Sternorrhyncha:
Aleyrodidae Aphidoidea Coccidae Monophlebidae Psyllidae


Coreidae, (the leaf-footed bugs)

Giant mesquite bug, nymph (Thasus spp.)
Giant mesquite bug, nymph (immature), in the genus Thasus, possibly a color variation of Thasus acutangulus, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ Several species go by the common name of giant mesquite bugs. This is why scientists use scientific names instead, so there is no confusion which species they mean.
Photographed by: Tino Garcia. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Fortin de las Flores, Veracruz, Mexico. Date: 13 April, 2014.
Giant mesquite bug (Thalus neocalifornicus)
Giant mesquite bug, nymph (immature), Thasus neocalifornicus, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ The nymphs of this giant mesquite bug can give off a bad-tasting secretion to help protect them from enemies, such as birds. Their bright colors warn birds to stay away.
Photographed by: Carol P. Byram. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Tucson, Arizona, USA. Date: 17 July, 2017.
Carol says, “I have a big old mesquite tree in the back yard. Funny I’ve never seen one of these before, as I’ve lived in this house 12 years.”
Giant mesquite bug (Thalus neocalifornicus)
Giant mesquite bug, female, Thasus neocalifornicus, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ The adult giant mesquite bug is a large bug. It can grow to nearly 2 inches (5 cm) long. Its hemelytra (forewings) have a thicker part with yellow veining, and a more membranous part with much finer veining, as seen here. Each antenna of the female (but not the male) have a flat, somewhat diamond-shaped disk.
Photographed by: Deb Braatz. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Benson, Arizona, USA. Date: 12 July, 2020.
Deb says, “I thought it was beautiful, markings so striking.”
Giant mesquite bug (Thalus spp.)
Giant mesquite bug, nymph (immature), either Thasus neocalifornicus or Thasus acutangulus, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ The giant mesquite bug nymphs look different as they go through their development, and the nymphs of one species can look like those of another. The nymph shown here could be a nymph of either the species Thasus neocalifornicus or Thasus acutangulus.
Photographed by: Mark Magers. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: near Lake Chapala in Jalisco, Mexico. Date: 12 July, 2020.
Mark says, “About the size of my thumb.”
Crusader bug (Mictis profana)
Crusader bug, Mictis profana, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ The large cross on the crusader bug gives it its alternate name of holy cross bug. They are quite common in Australia and Indonesia.
Photographed and identified to family by: Afier Jinda. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Indonesia. Date: 3 July, 2020.
Leaf-Footed Bug (Mozena obtusa)
Leaf-footed bug, nymph (immature), Mozena obtusa, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ The adult version of this leaf-footed bug looks quite different from the nymph in this photo. To see the adult, click here (Bugguide.net).
Photographed by: Shara Hinchey. Identified by: Ed Bynum, Ph.D, extension entomologist, Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center. Location: Amarillo, Texas, USA. Date: 8 August, 2014.
Mesquite Bug (Mozena arizoniensis)
Leaf-footed bug in the genus Mozena, possibly a mesquite bug Mozena arizoniensis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ The mesquite bug (a different species from the giant mesquite bug) has a long proboscis that it uses to poke into mesquite fruits to get at their seeds, which can therefore disrupt reseeding, but this bug does not seem to do much damage otherwise.
Photographed by: Anonymous. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Benson, Arizona, USA. Date: 10 June, 2020.
Florida Leaf-Footed Bug (Acanthocephala femorata)
Florida leaf-footed bug, male, Acanthocephala femorata, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ The male Florida leaf-footed bug (shown here) has a considerably enlarged hind-leg femur, as well as a spike that extends back from about the center of that enlarged femur. Both the enlarged hind-leg femur and spine are visible in this photo.
Photographed by: Terry C. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Acworth, Georgia, USA. Date: 11 November, 2015.
Florida Leaf-Footed Bug (Acanthocephala femorata)
Florida leaf-footed bug, nymph, Acanthocephala femorata, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ As shown in this photo, the nymph of the Florida leaf-footed bug is black with partially red to orange legs and a sharp-edged scalloping around the edge of its widened abdomen.
Photographed by: Margaret Molyson. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Georgia, USA. Date: 10 August, 2019.
Florida Leaf-Footed Bug (Acanthocephala femorata)
Leaf-footed bug, nymph, possibly Florida Leaf-Footed Bug Acanthocephala femorata, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ This photo was taken in North Carolina, which is the northern limit of the range for the Florida leaf-footed bug. See the comments below.
Photographed by: Donna Phillips. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Weaverville, North Carolina, USA. Date: summer, 2019.
Donna spotted in on a patio table, and says, “The little thing followed me when I moved around the table. I stepped back, and it jumped off the table onto the ground and continued following me! I guess it thought I was a really big food supply!!”
Leaf-Footed Bug (Acanthocephala terminalis)
Leaf-footed bug, Acanthocephala terminalis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ One characteristic feature of this species of leaf-footed bug is the orange tip on the end of each antenna.
Photographed and identified by: Leslie Mertz. Location: Kalkaska, Michigan, USA. Date: 8 July, 2012.
Leaf-Footed Bug (Acanthocephala terminalis)
Pair of leaf-footed bugs, Acanthocephala terminalis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ A careful look reveals two leaf-footed bug in this photo. And yes, they are mating.
Photographed and identified to order by: Daisy Rulz. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Mayville, Michigan, USA. Date: Summer, 2017.
Daisy says, “Was unaware there were two at first. Just saw something dark on the leaf.”
Leaf-Footed Bug (Acanthocephala terminalis)
Leaf-footed bug, Acanthocephala terminalis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ At first, KnowYourInsects.org thought this leaf-footed bug might be another species, Leptoglossus oppositus, because of its reddish-brown coloration, but the scallop on the “leaf” of the hind leg looks more like that of Acanthocephala terminalis. It is a tough call!
Photographed and identified to family by: Deborah Kindell. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: East Tennessee, USA. Date: September 2019.
Leaf-footed bug nymph (Acanthocephala terminalis)
Leaf-footed bug, nymph (immature), Acanthocephala terminalis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
Photographed and identified by: Tricia Bergstue and Jamie Haight. “One cool leaf-footed insect nymph!” Location: Busti, Chautauqua County, New York, USA. Date: 4 July, 2014.
Leaf-Footed Bug, Coreidae
Leaf-footed bug, nymph (immature), Acanthocephala terminalis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
Photographed by: Anne Fiore. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Spring Lake, Michigan, USA. Date: 3 August, 2014.
Leaf-footed bug (Acanthocephala terminalis)
Leaf-footed bug, nymph (immature), likely Acanthocephala terminalis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
Photographed by: Jon Wilco. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Northern New England, USA. Date: 6 September, 2017.
Leaf-footed bug (Acanthocephala terminalis)
Leaf-footed bug, nymph (immature), likely Acanthocephala terminalis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
Photographed by: Nikki Byer. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Etters, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 1 September, 2019.
Leaf-footed bug (Acanthocephala terminalis)
Leaf-footed bug, nymph (immature), likely Acanthocephala terminalis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
Leaf-footed bugs go through five stages, or instars, as nymphs before becoming an adult. The instars can look quite different. This is an early instar.
Photographed by: Michael J. Tapia. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: San Antonio, Texas, USA. Date: 18 May, 2020.
Leaf-footed bug (Acanthocephala terminalis)
Leaf-footed bug, nymph (immature), likely Acanthocephala terminalis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
Photographed and identified by: Andrew Feller. Location: Glastonbury, Connecticut, USA. Date: 12 July, 2020.
Giant leaf-footed bug (Acanthocephalus declivis)
Giant leaf-footed bug, Acanthocephala declivis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ The adult giant leaf-footed bug has a light-colored wash on its thorax, but it otherwise either brown or black. It has red antennae and feet, and a flared tibia on its hind legs. The flair on the tibia can be seen with a careful look at the right hind leg in this photo.
Photographed by: Diane Lamoureux. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Cleveland, Tennessee, USA. Date: 3 October, 2019.
Giant Leaf-Footed Bug (Acanthocephalus declivis)
Giant leaf-footed bug, Acanthocephalus declivis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ This nice side view of a giant leaf-footed bug shows off the strong profile of this insect.
Photographed and identified by: Reuben Margulies. Location: Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. Date: 26 August, 2020.
Giant Leaf-Footed Bug (Acanthocephalus declivis)
Leaf-footed bug, newly metamorphosed adult, in the genus Acanthocephala, quite possibly a giant leaf-footed bug, Acanthocephala declivis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ This newly metamorphosed adult leaf-footed bug will change from pink (as seen here) to its typical adult coloration of brown during the next few hours. These two beautiful photos showcase the shape of the flare on each hind leg (the flare is the “leaf” in leaf-footed). A close look at the photo of the underside shows the row of dark spots running up either side of the abdomen — the spots are spiracles or air holes. Insects draw in air through the spiracles rather than breathing through their mouths.
Photographed by: Jessica Yeckley. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Mac Anderson Park, Statesville, North Carolina, USA. Date: 26 August, 2019. Jessica says, “At first I thought it was a leaf until I looked closer.”
Giant Leaf-Footed Bug (Acanthocephalus declivis)
Giant leaf-footed bug, nymph (immature), Acanthocephalus declivis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ Adult giant leaf-footed bug often have a whitish wash on the thorax, as seen here.
Photographed by: Mary Porter. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Montgomery, Texas, USA. Date: 15 November, 2020.
Mary says, “I found him on the back door. He did not run when I approached him.”
Giant leaf-footed bug (Acanthocephalus declivis)
Giant leaf-footed bug, nymph (immature), Acanthocephalus declivis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ This giant leaf-footed bug is about 3.8 cm (1.5 inches) long!
Photographed by: Naj Kandala. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Houston, Texas, USA. Date: March, 2017.
Naj says, “I am hoping that my daughter will now do her kindergarten bug project on it.”
Giant Leaf-Footed Bug (Acanthocephalus declivis)
Giant leaf-footed bug, nymph (immature), Acanthocephalus declivis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ This giant leaf-footed bug nymph (immature) has a scallop-edged abdomen, and red antennae and femorae (“thighs”).
Photographed by: Tammy Deremer. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Dunnellon, Florida, USA. Date: 4 May, 2020.
Giant Leaf-Footed Bug (Acanthocephalus declivis)
Giant leaf-footed bug, nymph (immature), Acanthocephalus declivis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ This giant leaf-footed bug nymph is striking a typical pose with its abdomen slightly curled.
Photographed by: Kristin Roberson. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Huntsville, Alabama, USA. Date: 19 June, 2020.
Giant Leaf-Footed Bug (Acanthocephalus declivis)
Giant leaf-footed bug, nymph (immature), Acanthocephalus declivis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ Young giant leaf-footed bug nymphs have readily seen orange tips on the ends of their antennae. As they go through their stages (instars) toward adulthood, the orange fades.
Photographed by: Samantha White Powell. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Kentucky, USA. Date: 24 June, 2020.
Samantha says, “It was fun to see something we have never seen before, the whole family enjoyed it :)”
Leaf-Footed Bug (Acanthocephalus spp.)
Leaf-footed bug, nymph (immature), in the genus Acanthocephalus, likely Acanthocephalus declivis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
Photographed by: J. Carmack. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Winchester, Tennessee, USA. Date: 10 July, 2016.
J. Carmack says, “First time I have ever seen this type of insect.”
Leaf-Footed Bug (Acanthocephala spp.)
Leaf-footed bug in the genus Acanthocephalus, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
Photographed by: Bernard Solomon. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Monroe Township, New Jersey, USA. Date: 7 September, 2016.
Bernard says, “There seem to be many of the insects on what appear to be seed pods of the tree, however this is the first year I have noticed the insects on the tree.”
Leaf-Footed Bug (Anoplocnemis spp.)
Leaf-footed bug in the genus Anoplocnemis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ Some species of leaf-footed bugs in this genus are sexually dimorphic (the male looks noticeably different from the female) with the male having a much enlarged femur on each hind leg. The species of this individual is unknown.
Photographed by: Jumpum Gamlin. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Itanagar, Arunachal Pradesh, India. Date: 26 November, 2020.
Leaf-footed bug (Anoplocnemis phasianus)
Leaf-footed bug in the genus Anoplocnemis, possibly Anoplocnemis phasianus, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ This species of leaf-footed bug has greatly enlarged femurs on its hind legs, which is a feature of species in the genus Anoplocnemis.
□ This may be the species known by the scientific name of Anoplocnemis phasianus, which when viewed from the top, may be orange, light brown, or very dark brown.
Photographed by: Amit S. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Pune, Maharashtra, India. Date: 8 May, 2021.
Amit spotted it “taking shelter under the leaves during rain.”
Add your photo here!
Western Leaf-Footed Bug (Leptoglossus zonatus)
Western leaf-footed bug, Leptoglossus zonatus, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ Three species share the common name western leaf-footed bug. All have the white zigzag across the back (actually on the wings). This species, Leptoglossus zonatus, is distinguished by the two light-colored spots behind the head.
Photographed by: Susan Clarke-Romero. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Bakersfield, California, USA. Date: 4 July, 2017.
Susan says, “He stopped me dead in my tracks! It’s nice to know what he is.” Thanks also to Susan’s dad Jim for originally sending in the photo.
Western Leaf-Footed Bug (Leptoglossus clypealis)
Western Leaf-Footed Bug, Leptoglossus clypealis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ The scientific species name of clypealis refers to the small needle-like structure on the front of this western leaf-footed bug’s head, which is just visible in this photo. That structure is actually an extension of a plate, called a clypeus, on the insect’s “face”.
Photographed by: Pam Meintzer. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Johnstown, Colorado, USA. Date: 12 October, 2016.
Pam says, “Ahhhhhhhhh!!!! It is huge and creepy-looking. I don’t know what it is; hope you know!”
Western Leaf-Footed Bug (Leptoglossus clypealis_
Western leaf-footed bug, Leptoglossus clypealis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ Note the wide flair on the hind legs of this western leaf-footed bug. It almost looks like a leaf, and that is the origin of the name “leaf-footed”.
Photographed and identified by: Chris McClelland. Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. Date: 13 October, 2017.
Chris photographed this bug on a bench in her backyard.
Western Conifer Seed Bug (Leptoglossus occidentalis)
Western conifer seed bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
Western conifer seed bugs are very difficult to discern from other species in this genus. A good (but technical) description of the species in this genus is available in a 1990 article, “Eastern Range Extension of Leptoglossus occidentalis With a Key to Leptoglossus Species of America North of Mexico (Heteroptera: Coreidae)” in the journal Great Lakes Entomologist..
Photographed and identified to genus by: Tia and Scott Levinson. Location: Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New York, USA. Date: 6 February, 2018.
Tia says, “This guy joined us for dinner.”
Western Conifer Seed Bug (Leptoglossus occidentalis)
Western Conifer Seed Bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ This western conifer seed bug is native to the western United States, but started to march east around the middle of the 20th century, and is now found in the northeastern United States, where this photo was taken.
Photographed and identified by: Karen Dillon. Location: Berlin, Vermont, USA. Date: 10 March, 2017.
Karen says, “Climbing on my indoor window in the first week of March! Maybe escaped from some potting soil. I love the little ‘alien face’ on his upper back.”
Western Conifer Seed Bug (Leptoglossus occidentalis)
Western conifer seed bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ Native to the western United States, the western conifer seed bug first appeared in Europe in 1999. It showed up in southern England in 2009 and has since spread north. This photo was taken on the east coast of central England.
Photographed by: Margaret Bowles. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Norfolk, east coast of England, UK. Date: 29 October, 2018.
Margaret says, “I’ve never seen a bug like it before so was curious.” KnowYourInsects.org says, “Curious people are the most interesting people!”
Western Conifer Seed Bug (Leptoglossus occidentalis)
Western conifer seed bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ Although western conifer seed bugs do no damage to homes, they are still considered a pest in the U.S. Midwest, where this photo was taken, because they seek out the warmth of the indoors once the weather begins to chill in the fall. Homeowners frequently report finding one or more every day from fall through early spring.
Photographed and identified to order by: Lenore Schmidt. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Roseville, California, USA. Date: 9 October, 2018.
Lenore took this photo in her backyard.
Western Conifer Seed Bug (Leptoglossus occidentalis)
Western conifer seed bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ When cooler weather sets in, western conifer seed bugs will sometimes seek shelter indoors. They don’t bite, but if they feel threatened (e.g., if you try to pick one up), they may emit a pungent odor. That’s their defense mechanism!
Photographed by: Cindy Karch. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Macungie, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 8 August, 2017.
Cindy says, “So cool! ... It’s really beautiful.”
Western Conifer Seed Bug (Leptoglossus occidentalis)
Western conifer seed bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ This top-view photo of a western conifer seed bugs clearly shows that its forewings have a leathery half and a membranous half. That half-and-half feature is characteristic of the order Hemiptera — Hemiptera literally translates to “half wing.”
Photographed by: Paul Cramer. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Sewickley, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 11 April, 2020.
Western Conifer Seed Bug (Leptoglossus occidentalis)
Western conifer seed bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ This photo of a western conifer seed bugs shows off the boldly colored and patterned abdomen.
Photographed and identified to order by: Bill Foster. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Nova Scotia, Canada. Date: 24 February, 2021.
Eastern Leaf-Footed Bug (Leptoglossus phyllopus)
Eastern leaf-footed bug, Leptoglossus phyllopus, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ The eastern leaf-footed bug is a brown insect with a distinguishing light-colored, straight “belt,” as readily seen in this photo. This bug is found in both the eastern and the southern United States, as well as northern Mexico.
Photographed by: Mary Ann Pape. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: San Angelo, Texas, USA. Date: 10 August, 2019.
Mary Ann found several on a cactus in her yard, and says, “They do fly; one got on my back!”
Eastern Leaf-Footed Bug (Leptoglossus phyllopus)
Eastern leaf-footed bug, nymph, Leptoglossus phyllopus, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ This nymph of an eastern leaf-footed bug has tiny spiky projections all around its abdomen. The eggs look like short brown tubes, and they are laid in long rows, one after another. More information is available here.
Photographed by: Crystal Allbritton. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: West Monroe, Louisiana, USA. Date: 31 July, 2020.
Crystal found lots of these nymphs on her tomatoes.
Leaf-footed Pine Seed Bug (Leptoglossus corculus)
Leaf-footed pine seed bug, Leptoglossus corculus, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ The leaf-footed pine seed bug has three small white dots, as well as an often-faint and blurred white zigzag on its back. The three white dots are visible in this photo, but not the zigzag pattern. Another feature of this species is the series of light-colored lines that run along each side of its abdomen. If you zoom in, you can see them (especially along the lower part of the abdomen in this photo).
Photographed by: Anonymous. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Dutchess County, New York, USA. Date: 15 September, 2017.
Leaf-Footed Bug (Catorhintha spp.)
Leaf-footed bug in the genus Catorhintha, possibly Catorhintha selector, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
Catorhintha selector is a fairly flat insect that is brown or grayish-brown with a cream-colored border around the abdomen when viewed from the topside. When viewed from the underside, it looks all cream-colored. A similar species, Catorhintha divergens has obvious black spots on the tips of its antennae, whereas Catorhintha selector has antennae without the black spots. Entomologist Igor Dimitri Forero Fuentes identified it as being in “the genus Catorhintha or very similar.”
Photographed by: Éireann. Identified to genus by: entomologist Igor Dimitri Forero Fuentes, Ph.D., Pontificia Universidad Javeriana in Bogotá, Colombia. Thank you, Dr. Fuentes! Location: Colombia. Date: 9 July, 2019.
Sweet Potato Bug (Physomerus grossipes)
Sweet potato bug, Physomerus grossipes, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ The sweet potato bug is native to southeast Asia, but it has made its way to Hawaii, where this photo was taken. A few characteristics of this insect include the jagged orange trim around the abdomen, the thin orange line down the middle of the pronotum (the plate over the thorax), and the enlarged femur of each hind leg. And they do indeed like sweet potato plants — see the photographer’s comment below.
Photographed and identified by: Wes Lum. Location: Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. Date: 25 March, 2019.
Wes found this one on a rose bush in his yard ... near the sweet potatoes. He says, “I was worried they were going to eat my roses. Looks like they were here for something else. LOL”
Sweet Potato Bug (Physomerus grossipes)
Sweet potato bug, Physomerus grossipes, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ The sweet potato bug is sometimes called a large spine-footed bug or a stout-legged bug, both referring to its hind legs. As seen here, the femur of each hind leg is quite robust, and the tibia of each hind leg also sports a large spine.
Photographed by: Amit S. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Pune, Maharashtra, India. Date: 22 November, 2020.
Helmeted Squash Bug (Euthochtha galeator)
Helmeted squash bug, nymph (immature), Euthochtha galeator, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ Notice the white tibiae on this helmeted squash bug. Although not visible in this photo, another characteristic of the males of this species is a tiny flap on either side of the body — on the thorax just in front of the abdomen (an area called the metepimeron). More information about this bug, which can be a pest on roses, is available here.
Photographed by: Sheldon L. Boyd. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: The Villages, Florida, USA. Date: 8 June, 2019.
Coreid Bug (Enoplops disciger)
Coreid bug, Enoplops disciger or Enoplops sibiricus, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ This coreid bug has an interesting widening of its second-to-last antennal segment. Entomologist Pierre Moulet of Museum Requien said Enoplops sibiricus has been found in Mongolia, but Enoplops disciger hasn’t, and yet this specimen appears to be Enoplops disciger.
Photographed by: Ulzii Bayar. Identified by: Entomologist Pierre Moulet of Museum Requien in Avignon, France. Thank you, Dr. Moulet! Location: Mongolia. Date: 7 October, 2019.
Dr. Moulet adds, “Enoplops disciger is well-known from “Eastern Europe and central Asia, but up to now, not recorded from Mongolia.”
Leaf-Footed bug (Homoeocerus [Anacanthocoris] striicornis)
Leaf-footed bug, Homoeocerus striicornis (sometimes listed as Anacanthocoris striicornis, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ This leaf-footed bug looks quite different when viewed from the side or the top. Both views show the white spot toward the tip of each antenna, and the body’s pretty lime-green coloration. The side view showcases the black-bordered white stripe on each side of the thorax, while the top view shows off the brown hemelytra (the forewings covering the back).
Photographed by: Éireann. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Singapore. Date: 11 July, 2019.
Leaf-Footed bug (Acanthocoris spp.)
Leaf-footed bug in the genus Acanthocoris, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ This leaf-footed bug has a very rough appearance, with a sharp forward sweep on both sides of its pronotum (the shield covering its thorax). KnowYourInsects.org was unable to find an exact match, but believes this is one of the species in the genus Acanthocoris. See the photographer’s comment below.
Photographed and identified to family by: John Kamau. Identified to tentative genus by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Githurai 45 near Nairobi, Kenya, Africa. Date: 24 April, 2020.
John found it in his kitchen and reports, “I used a tissue paper to hold it, but oh what an awful defensive smell!”
Prickly Pear Bug (Chelinidea tabulata)
Prickly pear bug, nymph (immature), Chelinidea tabulata, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ This is a nymph of a prickly pear bug, which is very closely related to the Cactus Bug also on this page. The adult is shown in the next photo. Photographed and identified to genus by: Manzeal Khanal. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: San Antonio, Texas, USA. Date: 24 August, 2019.
Prickly Pear Bug (Chelinidea tabulata)
Prickly pear bug, Chelinidea tabulata, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ This prickly pear bug shows off the two-part wings in this order of insects, because the front half of the wings has the pretty, white-lined, brown pattern, while the back half is all one color: greenish-brown. A close look at the greenish-brown portion reveals the wing veins. Photographed and identified by: Manzeal Khanal. Location: Uvalde, Texas, USA. Date: 11 August, 2018.
Cactus bug (Chelinidea vittiger)
Cactus bug, nymph (immature), Chelinidea vittiger, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ This cactus bugs nymph is actually on a cactus, and you can see some of the damage (white spots). It is sometimes called a Prickly Pear Cactus Bug, but usually that name is reserved for a closely related species, Chelinidea tabulata, which is pictured elsewhere on this page.
Photographed by: H. Barton/hbd images. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Arizona, USA. Date: 12 April, 2017.
H. Barton says, “I found dozens of these 1/8-–1/4-inch insects on my cactus in Arizona.” That’s about 3-6 mm.
Cactus bug (Chelinidea vittiger)
Cactus bug, nymph (immature), Chelinidea vittiger, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ The nymph of the cactus bug can look different from one stage of development to the next. One characteristic feature of many stages is the stripe that runs down its head. The adult also has the same stripe, but it has chocolate-colored wings with light-colored veins.
Photographed by: Jacob Hourt. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Wyoming, USA. Date: 20 August, 2018.
Cactus bug (Chelinidea vittiger)
Cactus bug, nymphs (immature), Chelinidea vittiger, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ The photographer found these young nymphs of cactus bugs, some of them actually on nopal cacti. When young, the nymphs may have a red or a black head and thorax, and green abdomen (as shown here).
Photographed by: Steven Arnold. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Waco, Texas, USA. Date: 15 August, 2019.
Steven says, “I took this photo at a house I’m painting. I thought they were baby spiders, but when I zoomed in, I noticed they had six legs and two large, thick antennae.”
Cactus Leaf-Footed Bug (Narnia spp.)
Cactus leaf-footed bug, mating pair, in the genus Narnia, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ These cactus leaf-footed bugs are mating while perched on the reddish-purple fruit of a prickly pear cactus.
Photographed and identified to family by: Manzeal Khanal. Identified to genus by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: San Antonio, Texas, USA. Date: 23 August, 2019.
Squash Bug (Gonocerus juniperi)
Squash bug, nymph (immature), Gonocerus juniperi, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ This is a nymph of this species of squash bug. The adult is reddish-brown with small black speckles and green trim around the abdomen, as shown here. Photographed by: Werner Kaufmann. Identified by: a German entomologist who wished to remain anonymous. Location: Vienna, Austria. Date: 1 August, 2015.
Squash Bug (Gonocerus juniperi)
Squash Bug, nymph (immature), possibly Gonocerus insidiator, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ The nymph of the squash bug known by the scientific name of Gonocerus insidiator will become an adult that is light brown with pinkish brown antennae and green legs. A photo of the adult is available here. Photographed by: Sarah Silvia. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Morocco. Date: 14 October, 2019.
Sarah says, “Found this on the mirror of the car in Morocco.”
Dock Bug (Coreus marginatus)
Dock bug, also sometimes called a Squash Bug, Coreus marginatus, subfamily Coreinae.
□ Compare this to the other photo of the dock bug. This one is lighter in color and has whitish antennae rather than red ones. The lovely mottling on its back is showcased in this photo. The photographer estimated that it was about 20mm long (about 3/4 inch).
Photographed by: Martin Towers. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Fakenham, Norfolk, England, UK. Date: 10 April, 2020.
Martin found it in his garden.
Dock Bug (Coreus marginatus)
Dock bug, also sometimes called a squash bug, Coreus marginatus, subfamily Coreinae, family Coreidae.
□ Note the hourglass figure on this dock bug, and its black-tipped antennae. A person with an eagle eye might see the two tiny, pointed projections located between the antennae. The projections are sensory structures called labial palps.
Photographed by: Bryan Wenham-Baker. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Near Ivybridge, South Hams, South Devon, England, UK. Date: 28 March, 2019.
Leaf-footed bug (Coreidae)
Leaf-footed bug (underside), family Coreidae.
Photographed by: Deb Paron. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Sumpter Township, Michigan, USA. Date: 28 September, 2015.
Deb says, “I was fascinated by its abdomen — it looks exactly like a hand grenade!”
Leaf-footed bug (Coreidae)
Leaf-footed bug, nymph (immature), family Coreidae.
Photographed by: Gegu Soe. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Yangon, Myanmar. Date: 23 April, 2020.

Reduviidae (the assassin bugs)

Wheel bug (Arilus cristatus)
Wheel bug, Arilus cristatus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ Notice the distinctive, spiky crest behind the head of the wheel bug.
Photographed and identified by: Kristin Snopek. Location: Sicklerville, New Jersey, USA. Date: 4 October, 2020.
Kristin says, “Found this nifty assassin bug on my Amaranth this afternoon.”
Wheel bug (Arilus cristatus)
Wheel bug, Arilus cristatus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ This is a great shot of the wheel bug’s long, red, spear-like beak!
Photographed and identified by: Charlie Winstead. Location: Warrick County, Indiana, USA. Date: November, 2014.
Charlie says, “I find the fine details of these creatures — too small for most folks to resolve with the naked eye — just incredible!” KnowYourInsects.org could not agree more!
Wheel bug (Arilus cristatus)
Wheel bug, Arilus cristatus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ Adult wheel bug are 1–1.25 inches long.
Photographed by: Lori Fioravanti. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Orefield, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 26 September, 2016.
Lori says, “I had never seen anything like them before (so unusual-looking) and was so curious about them.”
Wheel bug (Arilus cristatus)
Wheel bugs, mating pair, Arilus cristatus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ This is a mating pair of wheel bugs. As with many insect species, the male is the smaller of the two sexes.
Photographed by: Fletcher White. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Date: 26 September, 2016.
Wheel bug (Arilus cristatus)
Wheel bug, Arilus cristatus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ Notice how the flattened edges of the abdomen curl up slightly in this wheel bug.
Photographed by: Carlo Castoro. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: August 2015.
Carlo says it “looks like a leaf.”
Wheel bug (Arilus cristatus)
Wheel bug, Arilus cristatus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ See the comment below about this wheel bug — it is nice to be of service!
Photographed by: Darla Lee. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: West Virginia, USA. Date: 8 October, 2016.
Darla says, “My daughter discovered it this morning on our patio. We were very curious as to what kind of insect it was so we began looking it up on line. I loved how KnowYourInsects asked questions and narrowed the search for us.”
 Wheel bug (Arilus cristatus)
Wheel bug, Arilus cristatus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ This is a newly metamorphosed wheel bug, so it has just molted from a nymph (immature or juvenile) into an adult. The pink color will soon darken to browns and grays.
Photographed by: Jessica Claypool. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Unknown. Date: 19 September, 2016.
Wheel bug nymph (Arilus cristatus)
Wheel bug, nymph (immature), Arilus cristatus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ This is a great photo of the nymph of the wheel bug. Compare it to the photos of adults posted just before this one.
Photographed by: Jeremiah and Caitriona Kane. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: East Bradford, Pennsylvania. Date: 16 July, 2017.
“My wife, daughter and I were having a lot of fun trying to figure out what it was, so you responding so quickly made our night.” KnowYourInsects.org says, “This photo was a family affair: Louise found it, and her husband Jere and daughter Caitriona snapped the photo! Nice group effort, Kane family!”
Wheel bug nymph (Arilus cristatus)
Wheel bug, nymph (immature), Arilus cristatus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ The nymph of the wheel bug has a red and grizzled black body. Its antennae are also mainly black, but with red tips and a small red section about a third of the way from the head to the tip. Both red sections of the antennae are just visible in this photo.
Photographed and identified to family by: Robin Gassaway. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Hamilton, Illinois, USA. Date: 25 June, 2019.
Robin found this nymph in her backyard.
Wheel bug nymph (Arilus cristatus)
Wheel bug, nymphs (immatures), Arilus cristatus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ These little wheel bug nymphs have just hatched from the eggs (shown at top). Note the black adbomen, red thorax, and orange-tipped antennae on each of these nymphs.
Photographed by: Gail Outlaw. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: La Grange, North Carolina, USA. Date: 3 May, 2018.
Wheel bug (Arilus cristatus)
Wheel bug, Arilus cristatus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ This wheel bug is showing off its predatory behavior — it has speared a Japanese Beetle for lunch!
Photographed by: Russell Rowley. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: McDowell County, North Carolina, USA. Date: 3 May, 2018.
Russell says, “I have them on all my bushes and vines that attract Japanese Beetles.”
Wheel bug (Arilus cristatus)
Wheel bug, Arilus cristatus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ This cool photo shows an adult wheel bug (top) just after it has molted from the final-stage nymph casing (below). A Wheel Bug hatches from an egg into a nymph, and then goes through stages (called instars), molting each time until becoming an adult. After emerging, the Wheel Bug darkens from pink (shown here) into its brown adult coloration.
Photographed by: Kim Pickett. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Date: 3 May, 2018.
Kim says, “We were extremely fascinated for days at work. It did turn brown the next day.”
Milkweed Assassin Bug (Zelus longipes)
Milkweed assassin bug, also known as a long-legged assassin bug, Zelus longipes, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ The milkweed assassin bug doesn’t hang out on milkweed plants, but it is known as a Milkweed Assassin Bug because its black and red pattern looks rather like that of a small milkweed bug (Lygaeus kalmii), which can be seen on Bugguide.net here.
Photographed and identified to family by: Sheldon L. Boyd. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: The Villages, Florida, USA. Date: 8 September, 2019.
Milkweed Assassin Bug (Zelus longipes)
Milkweed assassin bug, also known as a long-legged assassin bug, nymph, Zelus longipes, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ This is the nymph (immature) of a milkweed assassin bug. Adults and nymphs of this species can be found on a variety of garden plants, where they prey on pest insects, such as rootworms and other caterpillars, mosquitoes, and cucumber beetles.
Photographed by: Ivan Maldonado. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Pachuca, Mexico. Date: 1 August, 2019.
Assassin Bug, possibly (Zelus longipes)
Assassin bug, possibly a milkweed assassin bug, nymph, Zelus longipes, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ Check out the story below behind this assassin bug nymph. The long, curved, needle-like proboscis is especially evident in this great closeup photo.
Photographed and identified by: John Obermann. Location: South-central Georgia, USA. Date: 8 August, 2020.
John says he was brushing his dog when ... “I had the misfortune of brushing off my dog this morning. It took my brain a second or two to realize that I was being stung in the thumb by what I thought was just a little blossom from a plant or shrub.... What’s odd is the front stinging proboscis, which rivals the length of many wasps.”
Assassin Bug (Zelus spp.)
Assassin bug, possibly in the genus Zelus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ This elegant-looking assassin bug has extremely long and thin legs and antennae. This excellent photograph also shows the small point extending up from its thorax.
Photographed by: Abhishek Gawande. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Karad, Aatara, Maharashtra, India. Date: 29 September, 2018.
Abhishek says, “I captured this photograph near a tube light.”
Sundew Assassin Bug (Zelus luridus)
Sundew assassin bug, also known as a pale green assassin bug, Zelus luridus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ The sundew assassin bug secretes a sticky substance, called sundew, that helps their front legs grab onto prey. (Most other assassin bugs don’t secrete a sticky substance.)
Photographed by: Marian Williams. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: near Waco, Carroll County, Georgia, USA. Date: 27 August, 2017.
Marian says, “I’m sure I’ve seen similar bugs before but never looked so close. I found him/her to be very interesting.”
Sundew Assassin Bug (Zelus luridus)
Sundew assassin bug, also known as a pale green assassin bug, Zelus luridus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
Photographed by: Marian Williams. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org.
□ A key characteristic of the sundew assassin bug is the pair of thorn-like projections on the thorax, as shown here. Note: Although they are sometimes called Pale Green Assassin Bugs, this species is not always pale green.
Location: near Waco, Carroll County, Georgia, USA. Date: 27 August, 2017.
Sundew Assassin Bug  (Zelus luridus)
Sundew assassin bug, also known as a pale green assassin bug, nymph (immature), Zelus luridus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ This is a nymph (immature) of a sundew assassin bug, and it is exhibiting its predatory behavior — this is why they are called assassin bugs! (See Erik’s comment below.)
Photographed by: Arthur Ferruzzi. Submitted by: Erik Paschke. Identified by KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Michigan. Date: 26 April, 2018.
Erik says, “This bug was sucking the head of an ant.”
Sundew Assassin Bug/Pale Green Assassin Bug  (Zelus luridus)
Sundew assassin bug, also known as a pale green assassin bug, nymph (immature), Zelus luridus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ The photographer reports that this sundew assassin bug was about 3/8 inch (about 0.9 cm) in body length, and less than 3/4 inch (1.9 cm) in total length, including antenna.
Photographed by: Don Leith. Identified by KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Lyon Township, Michigan. Date: 10 November, 2018.
Don says, “My boys are regularly spotting new creatures and we enjoy the online hunt of identifying and understanding their place in our ecosystem.” KnowYourInsects.org applauds this family effort!
Four-Spurred Assassin Bug (Nezara viridula)
Four-spurred assassin bug, Zelus tetracanthus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ The species (tetracanthus) name of the four-spurred assassin bug literally means “four spines.” It refers to the four small bumps poking upwards from its pronotum (the plate-like covering over the thorax). Two of the spurs are visible at the back edge of the pronotum in this excellent photo.
Photographed by: Thomas Langhans. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. See Thomas’s full-size image here. Location: city of San Bruno, county of San Mateo, California, USA. Date: 8 November, 2018.
Leafhopper Assassin Bug (Nezara renardii)
Assassin bug in the genus Zelus, quite possibly the leafhopper assassin bug Zelus renardii, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ The leafhopper assassin bug lives up to its name: It catches and eats leafhoppers! It also is fond of other insects, including aphids, thrips and small caterpillars, and is sometimes even sold to gardeners to help keep pest numbers down.
Photographed by: Yanni Petropoulos. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: mainland of southwest Greece. Date: 19 April, 2020.
Yanni says, “It kept me company inside the house for three weeks, always hanging by the window curtain.”
Leafhopper Assassin Bug (Nezara renardii)
Leafhopper assassin bug Zelus renardii, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ A study back in 2010 showed that the newly hatched nymphs (immatures) of leafhopper assassin bugs smear sticky goop from the eggs onto their legs, and that goop helps them grab onto flies, which they then eat. Originally from western North America and western Central America, it is now found in many parts of the world.
Photographed by: Nicole Burlison. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Medford, Oregon, USA. Date: 19 April, 2020.
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Spiny Assassin Bug (Sinea spp.)
Spiny assassin bug, nymph (immature), genus Sinea, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ This nymph of the spiny assassin bug has prominent spiness. The adult still has spines, but they are much less pronounced than those on the nymph. The lower photo clearly shows its long spear-like mouthparts.
Photographed by: Heather Bond. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Tucker, Georgia, USA. Date: 30 June, 2017.
Heather says, “It was found in my kitchen on the counter.”
Spiny Assassin Bug nymph (Sinea spp.)
Spiny assassin bug, nymph (immature), genus Sinea, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ This nymph of a spiny assassin bug is sporting some very impressive spines! The photographer found this one in Maine, but it is possible this insect came from Pennsylvania. See his comment below.
Photographed by: Daniel Sholes. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Maine, USA. Date: 6 August, 2018.
Daniel says, “I’m a log home builder in Maine. Our kits are shipped from Pennsylvania. I’ve never seen anything like it.” KnowYourInsects.org had never seen this species either! Great find, Daniel!
Spiny Assassin Bug nymph (Sinea spp.)
Spiny assassin bug, nymph (immature), genus Sinea, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ To see what one of the spiny assassin bug species looks like as an adult, click this link to bugguide.net.
Photographed and identified by: Alice Speake. Location: central Alabama, USA. Date: 24 May, 2019.
Alice describes it as “very small and spiky.”
Spiny Assassin Bug nymph (Sinea spp.)
Spiny assassin bug, nymph (immature), in the genus Sinea, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
Photographed by: Joey Williams. Location: Virginia, USA. Date: 5 August, 2019.
Spiny Assassin Bug nymph (Sinea spp.)
Spiny assassin bug, nymph (immature), in the genus Sinea, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ The darker area in the center of this spiny assassin bug’s body is a pair of wing buds. Every time it molts as a nymph, its wingbuds get larger. It is only when it finally becomes an adult, however, that its wings reach full size and it is able to fly.
Photographed by: Carly Anderson. Location: Auburn, New York, USA. Date: 1 August, 2019.
Spiny Assassin Bug nymph (Sinea diadema)
Spiny assassin bug, nymph (immature), Sinea diadema, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ The spiny assassin bug uses those quite large and spiny front legs to grab prey. In addition, it has a long and thin beak beneath its head. It can swing out the beak like a switchblade to stab prey. To see what it looks like as an adult click here (bugguide.net).
Photographed by: Irene Giamella. Location: Hauppauge, New York, USA. Date: 23 July, 2019.
Irene spotted this one in her office.
Assassin Bug (genus Rhynocoris)
Assassin bug, in the genus Rhynocoris, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
Photographed by: Santhosh Kumar. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: India. Date: 3 December, 2017.
Santhosh says, “I found it on my neck.”
Assassin Bug (Doldina interjungens)
Assassin bug, Doldina interjungens, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ Despite its large size (see comment below), this assassin bug is rarely seen because it blends in so well with woody plant stems, where it often perches.
Photographed by: Marv Goldberg. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Tamarac, Florida, USA. Date: 20 May, 2020.
Marv says, “It was huge (in the 2-inch range).”
Orange Assassin Bug (Pselliopus barberi)
Orange assassin bug, nymph, Pselliopus barberi, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ This orange assassin bug is orange with black-and-white striped legs and antennae, and a clump of black spikes on the end of its abdomen.
Photographed by: Lisa Wolff. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Harrisburg, North Carolina, USA. Date: 17 July, 2019.
Lisa and her family found this Orange Assassin Bug “on our trampoline net in the backyard.”
Ringed Assassin Bug (Pselliopus cinctus)
Ringed assassin bug, Pselliopus cinctus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ The striping and soft coloration in this ringed assassin bug is distinctive. This bug preys on Buffalo Treehoppers.
Photographed by: Regina Rainey. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: southern Maryland, USA. Date: 25 September, 2017.
Regina went outside with her dog, and found this pretty little bug on her hair.
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Bee Killer Assassin Bug or Common Assassin Bug (Pristhesancus plagipennis)
Bee killer assassin bug or common assassin bug, eggs and nymphs, Pristhesancus plagipennis, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ These newly hatched nymphs of bee killer assassin bugs all emerged from the brown and white egg mass shown. As they grow go through several stages (called instars), their appearance will change. To see all stages from eggs through nymphal instars to adults, click here. Additional photos of adults and later-stage nymphs are on the line above.
Photographed by: Karen Eldridge. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Far North Coast of New South Wales, Australia. Date: 11 May, 2020.
Karen says she had seen the “oval, dark brown shape on the fly screen” for at least a month, but one day, spotted a circle of tiny black dots around it “ so I went outside and took this photo. I was amazed with these.”
Bee Killer Assassin Bug (Pristhesancus plagipennis)
Bee killer assassin bug, also known as a common assassin bug, Pristhesancus plagipennis, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ According to research published in the journal Nature Communications, bee killer assassin bugs “produce offensive and defensive venoms in anatomically distinct glands, an evolutionary adaptation that, to our knowledge, has not been described for any other venomous animal.” Offensively, they will use this venom on their prey: bees.
Photographed by: Peter Rowell. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Coopers Shoot (between Bangalow and Byron Bay), northern New South Wales, Australia. Date: 15 January, 2017.
Peter says he found it “on a Passion Fruit vine on the far north coast of NSW.”
Bee Killer Assassin Bug, nymph, (Pristhesancus plagipennis)
Bee killer assassin bug or common assassin bug, nymph (immature), Pristhesancus plagipennis, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae.
□ This later-stage (4th instar) nymph of the bee killer assassin bugs has a mottled brown/red and black coloration with a white ring at its neck and a white spot in about the center of its back. To see newly hatched nymphs, which look quite different, see the photos on the next line.
Photographed by: Willy Sufianto. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Date: 8 February, 2020.
Add your photo here!
Jagged Ambush Bug (Phymata spp.)
Jagged Ambush Bug in the genus Phymata, subfamily Phymatinae, family Reduviidae.
□ The body of the jagged ambush bug looks almost robotic, as if it is encased in armor. Its front legs are reminiscent of the raptorial front legs of a praying mantis, and are ideally suited for grabbing and holding prey.
Photographed and identified by: Manzeal Khanal. Location: Cooks Slough Nature Park, Uvalde, Texas, USA. Date: 7 June, 2020.
Manzeal spotted this bug on Jeruselam artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus). Manzeal adds, “ I could identify it looking on your (knowyourinsects.org) website.” KnowYourInsects.org says, “Nicely done, Manzeal!”
Jagged Ambush Bug (Phymata spp.)
Jagged ambush bug, nymph (immature), in the genus Phymata, subfamily Phymatinae, family Reduviidae.
□ This series of photos shows this jagged ambush bug from the side, and also very close-up from the bottom, which gives a great view of the piercing mouthparts and strong, grasping, raptorial forelegs.
Photographed by: Sean Spicer. Identified to genus by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Carquinez Straight Regional Shoreline area Martinez, California, USA. Date: 1 June, 2020.
Pennsylvania Jagged Ambush Bug (Phymata pennsylvanica)
Jagged ambush bug, probably Phymata pennsylvanica, subfamily Phymatinae, family Reduviidae.
□ This jagged ambush bug with its almost triangular outline could be one of two very similar species in the genus Phymata: P. pennsylvanica or P. americana. Both have a broad dark band toward the rear of the body, and large forelegs, but P. americana has has an abdomen that is more smoothly rounded all the way around, whereas P. pennsylvanica has more of a pointed angle at at the banded portion of the abdomen.
Photographed by: Todd CMFN Taylor. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Rockwood, Michigan, USA. Date: 19 September, 2019.
Ambush Bug (Phymata spp.)
Ambush bug, nymph, probably in the genus Phymata, subfamily Phymatinae, family Reduviidae.
□ This ambush bug nymph (immature) is showing off its piercing mouthparts, called the rostrum. Notice the large forelegs, which are characteristic among species within this genus.
Photographed by: Jessica Milko. Identified to subfamily by: entomologist J. E. McPherson. (Thank you, Dr. McPherson!) Identified to genus by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Washington Township, Michigan, USA. Date: 28 July, 2018.
Jagged Ambush Bug (Phymata pennsylvanica)
Jagged ambush bug, possibly the Pennsylvania Ambush Bug, Phymata pennsylvanica, subfamily Phymatinae, family Reduviidae.
□ The jagged ambush bug earns the name “ambush,” because it sits still in flowers and waits for an unwary insect to happen by. When an insect comes close, the Jagged Ambush Bug lashes out with its large and strong forelegs, and grabs the prey. Prey may include all sorts of insects, including flies and bees that may be much larger than the ambush bug. Although the adult has wings (as shown), it is not a good flier and rarely flies.
Photographed by: Dave Brigham. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Lansing, Michigan, USA. Date: sometime in the 1970s.
Dave says he took this photo “with a 100 mm bellows, so it’s pretty small — guessing about 4mm.”
Jagged Ambush Bug (Phymata spp.)
Jagged ambush bug in the genus Phymata, nymph, subfamily Phymatinae, family Reduviidae.
□ When an unwary prey insect comes near, the jagged ambush bug lashes out with its large and strong forelegs. Its forelegs not only grab the prey, but also hold onto it as the Jagged Ambush Bug stabs the prey with its long beak. Check out the photographer’s comment about the tiny size (below).
Photographed and identified to family by: Gail Rowley, Ozark Stream Photography. Identified to genus by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Texas County, Missouri, USA. Date: 14 April, 2018.
Gail describes this as looking like “a speck of dust on my husband’s shirt after he was pulling invasive Spotted Knapweed in our field. The speck of ‘fluff’ moved, so I put it in a jar with a piece of house plant and captured a shot with all my extension tubes on my macro lens.”
Jagged Ambush Bug (Phymata spp.)
Jagged ambush bug in the genus Phymata, subfamily Phymatinae, family Reduviidae.
□ This photograph of an adult jagged ambush bug gives a good view of its large forelegs. This nymph has a wider thorax, suggesting that it is a later-state nymph (they go through several stages, or instars, before becoming an adult). The photographer gives a description below.
Photographed and identified to family by: Gail Rowley, Ozark Stream Photography. Identified to genus by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Texas County, Missouri, USA. Date: 14 April, 2018.
Gail says this was on a butterfly weed plant (Asclepias tuberosa) in her field. She says, “I was aiming for a flower’s insides with all my tubes and macro lens when this tiny guy became visible. My naked eye didn’t see it. It seems to be holding onto something in its ‘claws.’”
Jagged Ambush Bug (Phymata spp.)
Jagged ambush bug in the genus Phymata, subfamily Phymatinae, family Reduviidae.
□ This photograph of a nymph jagged ambush bug shows the curved shape of its back.
Photographed by: Sandra Rickett. Identified to genus by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: North Carolina, USA. Date: 26 July, 2020.
Jagged Ambush Bug (Phymata spp.)
Jagged ambush bug in the genus Phymata, subfamily Phymatinae, family Reduviidae.
□ This jagged ambush bug has apparently ambushed this fly, and has now stabbed it with its spear-like mouthparts.
Photographed by: Bear Barrow. Identified to genus by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Milliken, Colorado, USA. Date: 8 August, 2020.
Bear says, “Strangest bug I’ve seen.”
Western Corsair Bug (Rasahus thoracicus)
Western corsair bug, Rasahus thoracicus, subfamily Peiratinae, family Reduviidae.
□ This western corsair bug looks quite similar to the corsair assassin bug (Rasahus hamatus) shown elsewhere on this page, especially with the large spot on the rear of their wings. The Western Corsair Bug, however, also has orange flanking on the forward half of its wings, and the Corsair Assassin Bug does not.
Photographed by: LC. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: north of San Francisco, California, USA. Date: 28 August, 2016.
Western Corsair Bug (Rasahus thoracicus)
Western corsair bug, Rasahus thoracicus, subfamily Peiratinae, family Reduviidae.
Western corsair bugs usually go about their business of killing and eating other insects, and have no interaction with humans. If a person picks one up or otherwise harrasses it, however, the Western Corsair Bug can give a painful poke with their spear-like beak.
Photographed by: Anthony Romero. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Ventura, California, USA. Date: 12 July, 2018.
Anthony says, “Well, I think this is very cool. We had not seen such an interesting species before and I really had a difficult time tracking information down online not knowing the name, but you came through like a champ. Thank you for the insights and help.” KnowYourInsects.org says, “You’re welcome, Anthony!”
Corsair Assassin Bug (Rasahus hamatus)
Corsair assassin bug, Rasahus hamatus, subfamily Peiratinae, family Reduviidae.
□ The corsair assassin bug has dark forewings except for the single large spot in the center of each. Otherwise it is very similar in appearance to the western corsair bug (Rasahus thoracicus). The two species are in the same genus.
Photographed by: Heather Hazlett. Identified to order by KnowYourInsects.org. Location: central Texas, USA. Date: 2 June, 2017.
Assassin Bug (Rasahus spp.)
Assassin bug, nymph (immature), probably in the genus Rasahus (perhaps Sirthenea), subfamily Peiratinae, family Reduviidae.
□ This subfamily of assassin bugs (Peiratinae) has only three genera in the United States. The coloration and body shape suggest this one is in the genus Rasahus, but the long head gives the impression that it might be in the genus Sirthenea, according to entomologist Christiane Weirauch of the University of California, Riverside. Bugguide says species in this subfamily “are known for their notoriously painful bites,” to which the photographer says his wife can attest.
Photographed by: Kevin Watkins. Identified to order by: Al Newton of the Field Museum in Chicago, Illinois. Identified to genus by: entomologist Christiane Weirauch of the University of California, Riverside. Thank you, Dr. Newton and Dr. Weirauch! Location: northwest Alabama, USA. Date: 28 October, 2018.
Kevin says, “I have lived here in northwest Alabama for 50 years and was raised on a farm. In all that time I have never come across anything like this.” KnowYourInsects.org says, “We hadn’t either!”
Blood-Sucking Conenose (Triatoma spp.)
Blood-sucking conenose, a species in the Triatoma genus, subfamily Triatominae, family Reduviidae.
□ See the note below about this blood-sucking conenose, which is associated with serious disease. It is sometimes erroneously called a “masked hunter,” but the real Masked Hunter is a separate species and not even in the same genus as the Conenose. To read more about the Conenose, click here.
Photographed and identified to order by: Robert Lewis. Identified to genus by Thi Nhi Pham, Institute of Ecology and Biological Resources, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology. Location: Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Date: 17 March, 2017.
Thi Nhi Pham notes that all members of the subfamily Triatominae “are blood-sucking insects that can transmit serious diseases.”
Neotropical Assassin Bug (Microtomus cinctipes)
Neotropical assassin bug in the genus Microtomus, possibly Microtomus cinctipes, subfamily Microtinae, family Reduviidae.
□ Bolivia has a few similar-looking species of neotropical assassin bugs in the genus Microtomus, and this one is a close match for the species Microtomus cinctipes. The bold white patch across its back, the red-and-black border on the abdomen, and the small red blotches on the femur of each leg (look carefully to see them!) are all features of this species. Researchers are still finding Microtomus cinctipes in new locations, including in Panama in 2019.
Photographed by: Nicolás Christopher Petit. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: San Ignacio, Bolivia. Date: 23 December, 2019.
Neotropical Assassin Bug (Microtomus purcis)
Assassin bug, Microtomus purcis, subfamily Microtinae, family Reduviidae.
□ As seen in the previous photo, several species of assassin bugs in this genus (Microtomus) have a similar appearance with the white patches on the back, and the red-and-black bordered abdomen. This species has more prominent red blotches on each femur.
□ Geography was also helpful in identifying this one: It was found in southern Indiana, which is as far north as this species extends. It is often found under bark, where it looks for cockroaches (and scorpions farther south in its range) to kill and eat.
Photographed by: G. H. Morrison. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Huntingburg, Indiana, USA. Date: 17 September, 2020.
Assassin Bug (Oncocephalus schioedtei)
Assassin bug in the genus Oncocephalus, possibly Oncocephalus schioedtei, subfamily Stenopodainae, family Reduviidae.
□ This assassin bug has a streamlined body, and its elytra (the wings covering its back) have a wood-grain pattern with dark markings. Members of this subfamily (Stenopodainae) are typically native to tropical rainforests, but have moved into farmlands.
Photographed by: Marutesh L. Patil. Identified to genus by: entomologist Dunston P. Ambrose of St. Xavier’s College in India. Thank you, Dr. Ambrose! Location: Titwala, Manda, Tatwala, Maharashtra, India. Date: 31 March, 2020.
Identifier Dunston P. Ambrose says, “It looks like Oncocephalus sp.( Stenopodainae), however I cannot authenticate without seeing the specimen.”
Masked Hunter (Reduvius personatus)
Assassin bug, possibly a masked hunter, Reduvius personatus, subfamily Reduviinae, family Reduviidae.
□ The masked hunter is sometimes called a masked bed bug hunter because it attacks and eats bed bugs, among assorted other invertebrates. It is a nocturnal hunter, and usually stays out of sight during the day. Note: The Blood-Sucking Conenose (shown elsewhere on this page) is sometimes erroneously called a “masked hunter,” because it looks similar, but it is a separate species and not even in the same genus as the Masked Hunter. To read more about the Conenose, which can transmit serious disease, click here.
Photographed by: Anonymous. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Toronto, Canada. Date: 9 July, 2018.
Masked Hunter (Reduvius personatus)
Masked Hunter, nymph (immature), Reduvius personatus, subfamily Reduviinae, family Reduviidae.
□ Entomologist Duke Elsner provided this information about masked hunters: “The nymphs are coated with sticky hairs, and they get covered with whatever small particulate material they come in contact with. The adults are shining deep-brown to black, and do not have the sticky hairs.” To see the adult , click here.
Photographed by: Denise Rulason. Identified by: entomologist Duke Elsner. Thank you, Dr. Elsner! Location: Mayville, Michigan, USA. Date: 18 September, 2017.
Denise says, “It was “VERY small. Possibly (the size of the) eraser on a pencil for circumference with legs.”
Masked Hunter (Reduvius personatus)
Masked hunter, nymph (immature), Reduvius personatus, subfamily Reduviinae, family Reduviidae.
□ The photographer provided a video of this little fuzzball walking around. In fact, it is a nymph of an insect called a masked hunter. They do occasionally bite people as an act of defense — for instance, they might give a nip if a person accidentally leaned an arm on one.
Photographed by: Luca Calautti. Submitted by: Valentino Antonio. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org Location: Bolton, Ontario, Canada. Date: 15 August, 2019.
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Thread-Legged Bugs (Emesaya spp.)
A mating pair of assassin bugs, likely thread-legged bugs in the genus Emesaya, subfamily Emesinae, family Reduviidae.
□ It is difficult to see, but this is a mating pair of assassin bugs, probably the type known as thread-legged bugs, and they are connected hind end to hind end. Both the male and female are very skinny insects, four legs of each one is pointing forward and the hind pair extending out to the rear.
Photographed by: Meem Sarkar. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org (with a nudge in the right direction from entomologist Thies Büscher). Location: Bengaluru, Karnataka, India. Date: 15 October, 2015.
Thread-Legged Bug
Thread-legged bug, subfamily Emesinae, family Reduviidae.
□ This silhouette of an insect appears to be a thread-legged bug. Like mantids, thread-legged bugs hold the front pair of legs up off the ground and in the ready position, so they can fling them out to grab a passing prey insect. The front pair of legs look are on the right and look like antennae in this photo. The abdomen is the bulbous part of the insect at the left.
Photographed by: Denise Frank. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Punta Gorda Town, Belize, Central America. Date: 30 July, 2018.
Denise describes this as “SOMETHING I found on my window screen ... soooo skinny and thin I barely saw it... but it is definitely a critter of some sort.”
Thread-Legged Bug (Emesaya spp.)
Thread-legged bug in the genus Emesaya, subfamily Emesinae, family Reduviidae.
□ This thread-legged bug is sitting in the characteristic pose: four legs pointed forward and the hind pair extending to the rear. Its head is about in the middle and can be distinguished by the pair of somewhat-larger black spot, which are its eyes.
Photographed by: Eddie lim. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Larkin, Johor Bahru, Malaysia Date: 7 May, 2019.
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Assassin Bug, Reduviidae
Assassin bug, family Reduviidae.
□ Notice the beak that extends backward from the head in this assassin bug. It uses the beak to stab prey insects and suck out their body fluids.
Photographed by: Mark Smith. Identified to order by KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Huntington Woods, Michigan, USA. Date: 2 July, 2013.

Pentatomidae (the stink bugs)

White Stink Bug nymph (Degonetus serratus)
White stink bug, nymph (immature), Degonetus serratus, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ This stunning white stink bug nymph looks much more subdued as an adult — as an adult, it is ochre-colored. It feeds on teak (Tectona grandis), a tropical tree that produces much-appreciated hard wood, and the photographer found this nymph on a teak tree.
Photographed and identified to order by: Surabhika Panda. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Navsari, Gujarat, India. Date: 10 December, 2018.
Tomato Stink Bug nymphs (Arvelius albopunctatus)
Tomato stink bug, nymphs (immature), Arvelius albopunctatus, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ A row of tomato stink bug nymphs line this stem of a pepper plant. The adults are green with black specks and yellow spots, as seen here (bugguide.net).
Photographed by: Yan L. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Jacksonville, Florida, USA. Date: 12 September, 2020.
green stink bug (Chinavia hilaris)
Green stink bug, Chinavia hilaris (formerly Acrosternum hilare), subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ The green stink bug (Chinavia hilaris) and the southern green stink bug (Nezara viridula) look almost identical. One way to tell them apart is to look for two tiny black dots at the corners of the scutellum, which is the triangular shield on their backs. If they have the two black dots, it’s a southern green stink bug (Nezara viridula). If they don’t (as shown here), it’s a green stink bug (Chinavia hilaris).
Photographed by: Kyle Lengerich. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Indiana, USA. Date: 2019.
Green stink bug (Chinavia hilaris)
Green stink bug, nymph (immature), Chinavia hilaris (formerly Acrosternum hilare), subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ Yes, there are several stink bugs that share the same common name of green stink bug, but they are actually separate species. And thank you to entomologist John E. McPherson, professor emeritus of Southern Illinois University, for the update on the scientific name.
Photographed by: Christine Howells. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Beckley, West Virginia. Date: 22 August, 2017.
green stink bug (Chinavia hilaris)
Green stink bug, nymph (immature), Chinavia hilaris (formerly Acrosternum hilare), subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ With stink bugs (and many other insects), it is important to not only look at the common names, but also the scientific names. For instance, this page includes both the green stink bug (Chinavia hilaris), and the southern green stink bug (Nezara viridula), which have similar common names, but are actually different species.
Photographed by: Dave Delman, M.D. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Jericho, New York, USA. Date: 29 October, 2017.
green stink bug (Chinavia hilaris)
Green stink bug, nymph (immature), Chinavia hilaris (formerly Acrosternum hilare), subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ The orange “shoulders” are just one of the distinguishing features of this green stink bug nymph.
Photographed by: Patti Donnellan. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Lorain County, northeastern Ohio, USA. Date: 8 September, 2016.
Patti says, “I didn’t know the green stinkers lived this far north. I have seen them when I lived in Alabama, but not up here.”
green stink bug (Chinavia hilaris)
Green stink bug, nymph (immature), Chinavia hilaris (formerly Acrosternum hilare), subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ This is a nymph (immature). As an adult, it is bright green, which is where it gets its descriptive if unimaginative common name of green stink bug. And thank you to entomologist John E. McPherson, professor emeritus of Southern Illinois University, for the update on the scientific name.
Photographed by: Patti Donnellan. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Lorain County, northeastern Ohio, USA. Date: 8 September, 2016.
Patti found it along a crushed limestone trail next to a wetland.
Southern Green Stink Bug (Nezara viridula)
Southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ This series of photographs of the southern green stink bug provides the view from the top, bottom and head-on. The bottom view shows the scent glands, which are the two gray shapes at the center of thorax and right behind the front legs. These glands are what produces the foul-smelling substance these insects are known for. In other words, they put the “stink” in stink bugs! The head-on view shows the two big compound eyes, plus two much smaller eyes (called ocelli) that look like orange-and-black droplets. The compound eyes help insects to see full images, while the ocelli are light-sensing receptors that pick up motion only — great for spotting and eluding approaching predators.
Photographed by: Thomas Langhans. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. See Thomas’s full-size images here, here, and here. Location: city of San Bruno, county of San Mateo, California, USA. Date: 27 April, 2018.
Thomas says, “Here is another character that liked our Nissan Leaf (I think they should have named it something else)! About 15 mm long. Spent a lot of time rubbing the antennae and mouthpart with the front legs.”
Southern Green Stink Bug (Nezara viridula)
Southern green stink bug, fourth instar nymph (immature), Nezara viridula, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ Insects go through stages as they grow, and the stages are called instars. This appears to be a fourth instar nymph of the southern green stink bug, so it only needs to molt twice more before becoming an adult. See the third instar and the adult of this species elsewhere on this page.
Photographed and identified by: Damian Duron. Location: Watsonville, California, USA. Date: 19 October, 2017.
Damian says, “I am afraid these guys are not too good for my garden. (They) infested my green beans this year.” KnowYourInsects.org replies, “We are gardeners, soo, so we share your pain!”
Southern Green Stink Bug (Nezara viridula)
Southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ Note the two tiny black dots on the scutellum (the triangular shield in the middle of the back) of this southern green stink bug. These dots help distinguish it from the green stink bug (Chinavia hilaris). These two photographs show the long and thin mouthparts tucked under the body (left) and extended (right). The mouthparts act as a spear and a straw: They stab into a plant, and then suck up the plant juices.
Photographed by: Thomas Langhans. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. See Thomas’s full-size images here and here. Location: city of San Bruno, county of San Mateo, California, USA. Date: 27 April, 2018.
Southern Green Stink Bug (Nezara viridula)
Southern green stink bug, also known as a Southern Green Shield Bug, third instar nymph (immature), Nezara viridula, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ This is called a southern green stink bug in the United States and a southern green shield bug in the United Kingdom. It is native to Africa, but has ventured to the UK, where this one was photographed, in the past couple of decades. This is a third instar nymph, so it still has to molt three more times before it becomes an adult. See the fourth instar and the adult of this species elsewhere on this page.
Photographed and identified by: Paula French. Location: Northwest London, UK. Date: August 2018.
Paula says, “There was a plant covered in these in my garden - I just managed to get this one when it stopped moving.”
Harlequin Bug (Murgantia histrionica)
Harlequin bug, mating pair, Murgantia histrionica, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ Even when photographed from this angle, this mating pair of harlequin bugs can be identified by the characteristic bicolored orange-and-white spots on their underside, and the pattern of white markings around the edge of the abdomen.
Photographed by: Kimberly Tilton-Riley. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Mission Trails, San Diego, California, USA. Date: 16 April, 2018.
Kimberly says, “Thank you for identifying these colorful creatures!” KnowYourInsects.org says, “You’re welcome!”
Stink Bug nymph (Erthesina acuminata)
Stink bug, sometimes called a yellow-spotted stink bug or eresthina stink bug, nymph (immature), Erthesina acuminata, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ This nymph of this yellow-spotted stink bug is light gray with two large spots on its abdomen: one that is black, and a second gray spot surrounded by a thin black outline. (The gray spot is difficult to see, but it is just in front of the black spot.) The adult is a much darker coloration with yellow spots, and can be seen by clicking here.
Photographed by: Mr. Mahesh DW. Identified to family by: Ajay Jadhao. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Nanded, Maharashtra, India. Date: 11 July, 2018.
Stink Bug nymph (Erthesina acuminata)
Stink bug, sometimes called a yellow-spotted stink bug or eresthina stink bug, nymph (immature), Erthesina acuminata, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ This photo gives another view of the large black oval on this yellow-spotted stink bug nymph’s back, and a second black-outlined oval circle in front of the black oval. A third, even-fainter circle is seen in front of the second. This is an early instar (young nymph). It is photographed here on guava.
Photographed and identified by: Amit Gojiya, Girish Patidar and Ranjit Thakor. Location: Agriculture Ahmedabad, Gujarat, Western India. Date: 9 October, 2018.
Stink Bug nymph (Erthesina acuminata)
Stink bug, sometimes called a yellow-spotted stink bug or eresthina stink bug, nymph (immature), Erthesina acuminata, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ This photo shows three nymphs (immatures) of a yellow-spotted stink bug: two that are gray with a large black spot on the abdomen; and one smaller and younger one in the lower right corner that has striping on its “shoulder”. The smaller one recently emerged from one of the eggs shown. To see the various stages of this stink bug, click here.
Photographed by: Vijay Mudaliar. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Pune, Maharashtra, India. Date: 13 November, 2020.
 Stink Bug (Agonoscelis nubilis)
Stink bug, Agonoscelis nubilis, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomatidae.
□ This stink bug blends in very well with the background, but if you look closely, you can see how beautiful it actually is. In some individuals, the orange wash on its hemelytra (the wings covering its abdomen) is much more pronounced than seen on this one. Either way, it is a lovely insect.
Photographed by: Bapi Debnath. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Mohanpur, Tripura, India. Date: 22 February, 2017.
Man-faced stink bug (Catacanthus incarnatus)
Man-faced stink bug, also known as man-faced shield bug, Catacanthus incarnatus, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ This is the red version, or morph, of the man-faced stink bug. Other color morphs are orange (see next photo), yellow, and a yellowish-white. They all have the same black markings. As with many other red insects, it is believed that the color advertises to predators that it is noxious, so they should look elsewhere for a meal.
□ The white underside provides a striking contrast to the red topside.
Photographed by: K J Westman. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Pamunugama, Sri Lanka. Date: 15 June, 2016.
This is one of K J’s favorite insects, and adds, “The man-faced stink bug is known here in Sri Lanka as the Jungle Dragon.”
Man-faced stink bug (Catacanthus incarnatus)
Man-faced stink bug, also known as man-faced shield bug, Catacanthus incarnatus, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ The black spots on this yellow morph of the man-faced stink bug may help protect it from predators by drawing their attention to the wings and away from the head, which is much more vulnerable to fatal damage.
Photographed by: Ahalya Katrak. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Mumbai, India. Date: 30 March, 2021.
Ahalya spotted this stink bug on the balcony and says, “It was walking like a marathoner (36-foot-long balcony). I saw this little fellow do three full rounds and still going on.”
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Twice-Stabbed Stink Bugs (Cosmopepla lintneriana)
Twice-stabbed stink bugs, Cosmopepla lintneriana, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ The two red blotches on its back give the twice-stabbed stink bug its colorful name. It is also sometimes known by the less imaginative names of Wee Harlequin Bug or a Two-Spotted Stink Bug. This female in this mating pair will lay her eggs on the underside of the leaves of all sorts of different plants, and then stick around to guard them as they develop. A large number of these bugs can damage flowers.
Photographed by: James Engebretson. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Forest County, Wisconsin, USA. Date: 4 June, 2020.
James spotted this pair on a lilac.
Bark Stink Bug (Cosmopepla lintneriana)
Bark stink bug, nymph, in the scientific genus Coenomorpha, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ This is the nymph of a bark stink bug. The adult will have a mottled brown color like this, and which does help it blend into the background when it is sitting on the bark of a tree.
Photographed by: Sarah Park. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Central African Republic. Date: 4 November, 2019.
Sarah says, “I found this interesting insect on my hibiscus plant. It was there for a couple of days, then moved over to the rosebush next door.” She adds, “Thanks for your website. It is really interesting (although there are definitely possibilities of nightmares there!)”
Cabbage Bug (Eurydema oleracea)
Cabbage bug, also known as a rape bug, crucifer shield bug, and brassica bug, Eurydema oleracea, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ The cabbage bug’s other common names refer to its diet: It eats rape (also known as rapeseed) and other plants in the mustard family (Brassicaceae), as well as cruciferous vegetables. The row of three white spots across the back is a distinctive feature of this bug.
Photographed and identified by: Jean-Louis Metzger. Location: Oxford, England, UK. Date: 15 July, 2019.
Cauliflower Bug (Eurydema ventralis)
Cauliflower bugs, mating pair, Eurydema ventralis, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ Several species in this genus are red with black markings. The pattern on this pair suggest they are cauliflower bugs. These insects will not only eat cauliflower, but other cruciferous vegetables.
Photographed by: Yanni Petropoulos. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: mainland of southwest Greece. Date: 23 June, 2020.
Stink Bug (Carbula scutellata)
Stink bug, Carbula scutellata, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ This species of stink bug has three, somewhat-connected, yellow spots on its scutellum (the triangle-shaped area on its back), and sharp points on the two outside tips of its pronotum.
Photographed by: Bhuvan Raj. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Karnataka ,Bangalore. Date: 17 October, 2019.
Stink Bug nymph (Chlorochroa spp.)
Stink bug, nymph (immature), in the genus Chlorochroa, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ Check out the photographer’s comments below to get a glimpse of the adventure involved in finding this stink bug!
Photographed by: Deborah Malitz. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve, Idaho, USA. Date: 16 August, 2017.
Deborah says, “(This photo) was taken at the top of a huge cinder cone we had climbed and the shiny rocks all around are cinder from volcanic explosions…. It was like being at the top of a mountain of black diamonds.”
Stink Bug (Banasa calva)
Banasa stink bug, Banasa calva, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ The half-and-half coloration of this banasa stink bug is typical for the species, but sometimes the hues are much more green. On the lighter half, the tiny pits that decorate this bug are easy to see.
Photographed by: Denise Rulason. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Mayville, Michigan, USA. Date: 1 June, 2018.
Banasa Stink Bug (Banasa formosus)
Banasa stink bug, Banasa formosus, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ The common name of banasa stink bug is shared with other species that also fall under the genus Banasa. A feature of this particular species is the rich green color, black “window frame” on its back; and the yellow or white tip on the end of its scutellum (the triangle of its thorax).
Photographed by: Bob McDevitt. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada. Date: 1 July, 2020.
Bob spotted this stink bug lounging on a lawn chair in the yard.
Hairy Shield Bug (Dolycoris baccarum)
Hairy shield bug, Dolycoris baccarum, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ This colorful hairy shield bug has a rich purplish back with a green triangle, and it is covered in short hairs, which can be seen on the legs in this photo. The purplish color turns brown in the winter. Other features are the black-and-white trim, and black-and-white striped antennae. See the photographer’s comment below.
Photographed and identified by: Bryan Wenham-Baker. Location: Near Ivybridge, South Hams, South Devon, England, UK. Date: 22 June, 2019.
Bryan says, “Nearly caught me out, looks like the colours have ‘swapped places’ with those on the Birch Shield Bug!”
Hairy Shield Bug (Dolycoris baccarum)
Hairy shield bug, Dolycoris baccarum, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ The hairy shield bug is also sometimes called a sloe bug. One of the characteristics of this bug is the light-colored tip on the scutellum (at the rear of the thorax). Even when this insect takes on its dull-brown winter coloration, the scutellum remains light-colored.
Photographed by: Jean-Louis Metzger. Location: Near Ivybridge, Oxford, England, UK. Date: 15 July, 2019.
Green shield bug (Palomena prasina)
Green shield bugs, mating pair, Palomena prasina, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ Depending on the lighting, that triangular section of tan wings on the green shield bug may appear dark brown. That section is actually where the back half of the forewings overlap. The back half is membranous, while the front half is much thicker and green.
Photographed and identified by: Bryan Wenham-Baker. Location: Near Ivybridge, South Hams, South Devon, England, UK. Date: 3 May, 2018.
Bryan says, “Sun came out this morning, nice walk, but when I returned home, found these two Green Shield Bugs mating. Can’t turn one's back for a minute!!”
Green shield bug (Palomena prasina)
Green shield bug, Palomena prasina, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ Other than the different overall coloration, the green shield bug has very similar features to the brown marmorated stink bug (shown elsewhere on this page), including the narrow brown and white “trim” around the outside.
Photographed by: Jean-Louis Metzger. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Oxford, England, UK. Date: 23 August, 2016.
Jean-Louis says, “Found in our garden on a piece of wood.”
Green shield bug (Palomena prasina)
Green shield bug, Palomena prasina, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ The color of this green shield bug has a bit more brown than is typical.
Photographed and identified by: Bryan Wenham-Baker. Location: Near Ivybridge, South Hams, South Devon, England, UK. Date: 11 February, 2018.
Bryan says, “This is my first bug of the year!” KnowYourInsects.org says, “Happy Bug Day, Bryan!”
Green shield bug (Palomena prasina)
Green shield bug, 4th instar nymph, Palomena prasina, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ This is a nymph (immature) of a green shield bug. It will go through one more stage (the 5th instar) before becoming an adult. Photos of the adult of this species are posted previously on this page.
Photographed and identified by: Bryan Wenham-Baker. Location: Near Ivybridge, South Hams, South Devon, England, UK. Date: 1 August, 2018.
Green shield bug (Palomena prasina)
Green shield bug, 5th instar nymph, Palomena prasina, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ This green shield bug is in its fifth and final stage (5th instar) as a nymph. Afterward, it will become an adult (also known as an imago). Some 5th instar nymphs have a black thorax and wing buds, rather than green as shown here. Photos of the adult of this species are posted previously on this page.
Photographed and identified by: Bryan Wenham-Baker. Location: Near Ivybridge, South Hams, South Devon, England, UK. Date: 21 August, 2019.
Forest bug (Pentatoma rufipes)
Forest bug, Pentatoma rufipes, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ The spot in the middle of this forest bug back may be colored cream to red. Actually, the spot is at the rear tip of the scutellum, which is the triangular-shaped part of the thorax.
Photographed by: Grant Spurr. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Cheshire County in northwest England, UK. Date: 18 September, 2017.
Grant says, “It was spotted in the garden in Cheshire. The spot on its back and around the edges of the body are red.”
Forest bug (Pentatoma rufipes)
Forest bug, also known as a red-legged shield bug, nymph, Pentatoma rufipes, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ This is the nymph of a forest bug, likely the last instar (or stage) before becoming an adult. A photo of the adult of this species is posted previously on this page.
Photographed by: Bryan Wenham-Baker. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Near Ivybridge, South Hams, South Devon, England, UK. Date: 1 August, 2018.
Bishop's Mitre Shield Bug (Aelia acuminata)
Bishop’s mitre shield bug, Aelia acuminata, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ The pointed head of this bishop’s mitre shield bug is quite reminiscent of the ceremonial pointed hats (or mitres) worn by many bishops of the Christian faith.
Photographed by: Jean-Louis Metzger. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Oxford, England, UK. Date: 16 September, 2017.
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Rough Stink Bug (Brochymena spp.)
Rough stink bug (sometimes called the predatory stink bug), in the genus Brochymena, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ The number of rough stink bugs has been declining in North America ever since the non-native and invasive stink bug called the brown marmorated stink bug (shown elsewhere on this page) arrived and began taking over territory where the rough stink bug is found.
Photographed by: Karen Skowron. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. Date: 28 January, 2018.
Karen describes, “Having found this insect on floor of my suite and watched its unusual behaviour of twirling around and how it calmed down when I put down a piece of paper and took its photo.”
Rough Stink Bug (Brochymena spp.)
Rough stink bug (sometimes called the predatory stink bug), in the genus Brochymena, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ The photographer asked if this was the invasive brown marmorated stink bug that has spread throughout much of the United States. A close look at this photo, however, shows a row of little teeth on the leading edge of the thorax (in the “shoulder” area right next to the eyes. Brown marmorated stink bugs do not have these teeth, but rough stink bugs do. So this is a rough stink bug, which is native to the United States.
Photographed by: Tara Castleberry. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Boise, Idaho, USA. Date: 29 September, 2018.
Tara says it came to her mountain home with the cooler weather. She is “thrilled it isn’t the invasive stinker :). ”
Stink Bug (Chlorocoris spp.)
Stink bug, nymph, in the genus Chlorocoris, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ This stink bug nymph has orange/red legs, banded antennae, and light half-circle markings around the edge of the abdomen.
Photographed and identified as a stink bug by: Mark Magers. Identified to genus by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: near Lake Chapala in Jalisco, Mexico. Date: 16 April, 2021.
brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys)
Brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ Zoom in on this one — amazing detail in this excellent photo of a brown marmorated stink bug.
Photographed and identified by: Charlie Winstead. Location: Warrick County, Indiana, USA. Date: Late autumn, 2014.
Charlie says this stink bug “settled in on the front window screen — most likely his (or her) final resting place for the coming winter season. At 50°F, he was motionless — allowing me to make several exposures with different focus points to combine (stacked) for this image.” KnowYourInsects.org says, “That is one gorgeous photo, Charlie!”
brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys)
Brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
Brown marmorated stink bug are native to Asia. In the mid-1990s, they were mistakenly introduced to the United States, where they have become a major agricultural pest.
Photographed by: Cindy Core. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Dearborn, Michigan, USA. Date: 1 August, 2015.
brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys)
Brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ Michigan State University is tracking sightings of the brown marmorated stink bug in Michigan (to report a sighting to MSU, click here.)
Photographed by: Maria Slowinski. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Union Pier, Michigan, USA. Date: 15 October, 2016.
Maria says, “We have a bit of a family of them flying around our cottage.”
brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys)
Brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ And here is a brown marmorated stink bug from Paris — they do get around!
Photographed by: François Robin-Champigneul. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Paris, France. Date: 7 December, 2017.
François says, “I’m not sure where it came from, possibly from my window but it could come also, I think, from a parcel I received from the USA or China, I’m not sure.” KnowYourInsects.org says, “Insects do indeed travel by air, ship, automobile, and just about any other kind of human transportation.”
brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys)
Brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ These images show the brown marmorated stink bug from the top and from the bottom.
Photographed by: Jodi H. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Windsor, Ontario, Canada. Date: 7 November, 2017.
Jodi says, “I have found 2 of these bugs dead in my house.”
brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys)
Brown marmorated stink bug, nymph (immature), Halyomorpha halys, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
□ The striped antennae and legs, along with the dark and light edge around the abdomen, are characteristic features of brown marmorated stink bugs.
Photographed by: Carlo Castoro. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Pasadena, Maryland, USA. Date: 9 September, 2017.
brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys)
Stink bug, nymph (immature), possibly brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
Photographed by: Gosal Das. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Agartala, Tripura, India. Date: 3 April, 2017.
Shield bug (Troilus luridus) eggs
Eggs, possibly eggs of the shield bug Troilus luridus, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
Photographed and identified by: Bruna Oliveira. Location: Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA. Date: 29 June, 2016.
Bruna wondered if Troilus luridus had been reported in Michigan, but a check with two Michigan State University entomologists had no reports of it as of summer 2016.
Bagrada bug or Painted bug (Bagrada hilaris)
Bagrada bug, also known as a painted bug, Bagrada hilaris, subfamily Pentatominae, family Pentatomidae.
Bagrada bugs are quite small insects at just 5-7 mm long (0.2-0.3 inches). They are found in southern Asia, southern Africa, and eastern Africa, and they have recently been introduced to the western and southern United States.
Photographed by: Muhammad Arshad, Entomology, UOS, Pakistan. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Sargodha, Punjab, Pakistan. Date: 25 April, 2018.
Muhammad says he found this one in a sunflower field.
Predatory stink bug nymph (subfamily Asopinae)
Predatory stink bug, nymph, subfamily Asopinae, family Pentatomidae.
□ The nymph (immature) of a predatory stink bug is attacking a large sawfly larva in this photo, which shows the stink bug’s long piercing moutparts.
Photographed by: Rabiya Ather. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: southern Ontario, Canada. Date: 18 July, 2020.
Rabiya found these two “fighting in my front lawn,” and adds “My kids are really interested in animal and insect life.”
Predatory stink bug nymph (Podisus spp.)
Predatory stink bug, nymph, in the genus Podisus, subfamily Asopinae, family Pentatomidae.
□ With the outlining on the head and thorax, and radiating stripes on its abdomen, this nymph (immature) of a predatory stink bug is quite striking.
Photographed by: Tammy Franck. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: northwest Illinois, USA. Date: 17 June, 2021.
Tammy found this nymph on her black current bushes.
Anchor Stink Bug (Stiretrus anchorago)
Anchor stink bug, nymph, Stiretrus anchorago, subfamily Asopinae, family Pentatomidae.
□ The anchor stink bug preys on caterpillars and beetle grubs, and is especially fond of beetle grubs that feed on beans and potatoes, so it is often seen in gardens.
Photographed by: Doug Neyer. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Wayne Township, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 1 August, 2020.
Doug says, “I have lived out in the country for 20 years, and this is the first time that I ever saw one of its kind.”
Anchor Stink Bug (Stiretrus anchorago)
Anchor stink bug, Stiretrus anchorago, subfamily Asopinae, family Pentatomidae.
□ As an adult, the anchor stink bug has a wide range of appearances. Some are cream and black; others are orange and black. Some have a pattern as seen here, and others have much more black. To see the variety, click here (bugguide.net).
Photographed and identified by: Grant MacDonald. Location: Avon Nature Study Area, Rochester, Michigan, USA. Date: 23 August, 2020.
Anchor Stink Bug (Stiretrus anchorago)
Anchor stink bug, Stiretrus anchorago, subfamily Asopinae, family Pentatomidae.
□ The photographer described this anchor stink bug as “pink with black spots and reddish legs.” This individual has very little black compared to some others. (It was moving quickly, so difficult to photograph.)
Photographed by: Austin Winkelman. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, USA. Date: 17 August, 2020.
Austin says, “So I was sitting on my deck (when it) flew at my daughter. Made her scream. Was kinda funny.”
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Florida Predatory Stink Bug (Euthyrhynchus floridanus)
Florida predatory stink bug, also known as a Halloween Bug, Euthyrhynchus floridanus, subfamily Asopinae, family Pentatomidae.
□ This Florida predatory stink bug is showing off its predatory nature: That’s a small prey creature that is speared on the end of its beak-like mouthparts. For more information on this bug, including some photos of its immature form (nymph), click here.
Photographed by: teacher Denise Jenkins and her class K3 and K4 at Centreville Academy. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Centreville Academy playground, Centreville, Mississippi, USA. Date: 20 October, 2018.
Denise says, “Thanks for all the information. My class thinks it so cool that you emailed me back and they know what kind of bug was on their playground.” KnowYourInsects.org says, “You’re welcome!”
Florida predatory stink bug (Euthyrhynchus floridanus)
Florida predatory stink bug, also known as a Halloween Bug, Euthyrhynchus floridanus, subfamily Asopinae, family Pentatomidae.
□ The Florida predatory stink bug is indeed predatory, and preys upon a variety of beetles and caterpillars that are garden pests, so this Stink Bug is considered beneficial.
Photographed by: James Marley. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Triad area of North Carolina, USA. Date: 13 November, 2019.
Muhammad says he found this one in a sunflower field.
Florida Predatory Stink Bug (Euthyrhynchus floridanus)
Florida predatory stink bugs, also known as a Halloween Bug, nymphs, Euthyrhynchus floridanus, subfamily Asopinae, family Pentatomidae.
Florida predatory stink bugs have some variation in the color: This one dark green with orange markings, while others are black or purplish-black with orange or orange-red markings.
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Photographed by: Stacy Mebane. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Fayetteville, North Carolina, USA. Date: 12 October, 2020.
Florida Predatory Stink Bug (Euthyrhynchus floridanus)
Florida predatory stink bugs, also known as a Halloween Bug, nymphs, Euthyrhynchus floridanus, subfamily Asopinae, family Pentatomidae.
□ These nymphs of the Florida predatory stink bug have recently hatched from their eggs. They will go through four more instars, or stages, before becoming an adult. Like the adults, the nymphs are predatory and are considered beneficial because they help reduce garden pests.
Photographed by: Tamron Waters. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Rocky Point, North Carolina, USA. Date: 29 March, 2020.
Tamron says, “They popped out from our outdoor water reel. Scared me to death, all these little creatures. I’ve never seen this before.”
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Two-spotted stink bug (Perillus bioculatus)
Two-spotted stink bug, Perillus bioculatus, subfamily Asopinae, family Pentatomidae.
□ If you didn’t know better, you might think someone painted on this art-deco pattern! The tan form of the two-spotted stink bug is usually a bit more ornate than the red form.
Photographed by: Angela Johnson. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Cascade, Montana, USA. Date: December, 2017.
Angela says, “Found this beetle on a window in our house. In December!” KnowYourInsects.org says, “While it is often assumed to be a beetle, it is actually a stink bug, which is in an entirely different insect order. Such a cool bug!”
Two-spotted stink bug (Perillus bioculatus)
Two-spotted stink bug, Perillus bioculatus, subfamily Asopinae, family Pentatomidae.
□ This is the “tan form” of this pretty two-spotted stink bug. It also comes in a red form (see the next photo). Two-spotted stink bugs are beneficial insects that prey on garden pests.
Photographed by: Sylvia Ringmacher. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Dilley, Texas, USA. Date: 27 October, 2018.
Two-spotted stink bug (Perillus bioculatus)
Two-spotted stink bug, Perillus bioculatus, subfamily Asopinae, family Pentatomidae.
□ This is the “red form” of the two-spotted stink bug. Some individuals have more of the orange-red accents, particularly outlining the scutellum (the rather triangular structure in the center of the back).
Photographed and identified by: Stephanie Hogle. Great identification, Stephanie! Location: Clinton County, Michigan, USA. Date: 17 September, 2020.
Stephanie spotted this stink bug on her lantana.
Two-Spotted Stink bug nymph (Perillus bioculatus)
Stink bug, nymph (immature), possibly a two-spotted stink bug, Perillus bioculatus, subfamily Asopinae, family Pentatomidae.
□ This is a nymph of one of the stink bugs, but even after checking with four stink bug experts, we cannot be sure of the species. Because it was found on potato plants, however, one of the experts said it was likely a two-spotted stink bug, which prey on Potato Beetles.
Photographed by: Jenny Hotz. Identification assistance provided by: entomologist Robert Koch of the University of Minnesota, and Tom Coudron of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service, who also consulted two other stink bug experts. Thank you all for your help! Location: Unknown. Date: 26 July, 2017.
Jenny says, “Found this bug in our potato field in Minnesota.... I’ve never seen anything like it before! ... P.S. We’ve named it the stormtrooper bug :)”
Sting Bug Eggs (Pentatomidae)
Stink bug, eggs, family Pentatomidae.
□ This photo shows a grouping of stink bug eggs on sugar cane. The species of the stink bug is unknown.
Photographed by: Mr. Mahesh DW. Identified to family by: Ajay Jadhao. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Nanded, Maharashtra, India. Date: 6 September, 2020.

Thyreocoridae (the ebony bugs)

Ebony Bug (Cydnoides spp.)
Ebony bug, possibly in the genus Cydnoides, family Thyreocoridae.
Ebony bugs are small, quite round insects related to stink bugs (family Pentatomidae). This one was just 4 mm long (less that 2/10 inch).
□ At first glance, these bugs look quite similar to beetles, particularly beetles in the family Histeridae (an example here (Bugguide.net), but ebony bugs have beak-like mouthparts and beetles do not. Look carefully at the side view and underside here to see the beak that curves down along its underside.
Photographed by: Thomas Langhans. See Thomas’s full-size images here, here and here. Location: San Bruno, county of San Mateo, California, USA. Date: 6 July, 2020.
Thomas says, “Liked to rub its antenna.”
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Plataspidae (the plataspid stink bugs)
Dinidoridae (the dinidorid bugs)

Black Stink Bug (Coptosoma xanthogramma)
Black stink bug, Coptosoma xanthogramma, subfamily Plataspidinae, family Plataspidae.
□ The black stink bug has a gold border around its back, doubled gold trim around its head and thorax, two oblong gold spots, a gold face, and striking red eyes. It is quite a handsome bug.
□ This Black Stink Bug was photographed in Hawaii. It was first reported in that state in 1965, and is believed to be native to the Philippines. It is a pest of beans and other legumes, jade vine, maunaloa vine, and other ornamental plants as well, according to a brief study of this bug that was done back in 1967 (the study is available here). Little else is known about this bug (or its entire family, Plataspidae).
Photographed by: Levent Akinci. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Kula, Maui, Hawaii, USA. Date: 31 May, 2020.
Levent spotted this Black Stink Bug on cilantro in the garden, and says, “I thought it was some sort of lady beetle, but couldn’t find anything that matched.”
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Red Pumpkin Bug (Coridius janus)
Red pumpkin bug, also sometimes called the Cucurbit Stink Bug, Coridius janus, subfamily Dinidorinae, family Dinidoridae.
□ The color of the red pumpkin bug ranges from bright red (as shown here) to light orange. Although not shown in this photo, the head is quite small compared to the body. It is sometimes called a Cucurbit Stink Bug, because it also feeds on other plants in the cucurbit family, including cucumbers and melons.
Photographed by: K J Westman. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org and Shalini Shivaprakash, scientist (Agril. Entomology), National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources, Bangalore, Karnataka, India. Thank you, Shalini Shivaprakash! Location: Nitulemada, Digana, Rajawella, Kandy, Sri Lanka. Date: 5 November, 2016.

Tessaratomidae (the tessaratomid bugs)

Lychee stink bug nymph (Tessaratoma papillosa)
Lychee stink bug, nymph (immature), Tessaratoma papillosa, subfamily Tessaratominae, family Tessaratomidae.
□ The almost-rectangular shape of the body in this lychee stink bug nymph is hidden once it becomes an adult and gets its wings. Nymphs of this species have a good deal of color variation with many being much redder.
Photographed by: Debajit Saha. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Assam, India. Date: 31 May, 2018.
Debajit says, “Found it in my garden.”
 Giant Shield Bug nymph (Eusthenes)
Giant shield bug, nymph (immature) in the genus Eusthenes, subfamily Tessaratominae, family Tessaratomidae.
□ This giant stink bug nymph is striking with the pink/red pattern.
Photographed by: Nitasha Chauhan. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Shimla, Himachal Pradesh, India. Date: 10 May, 2020.
Nitasha says, “I found this insect in my apple orchard.”
Green Giant Shield Bug (Pycanum rubens)
Green giant shield bug, Pycanum rubens, subfamily Tessaratominae, family Tessaratomidae.
Green giant shield bugs come in slightly different colors, and many have more of a green shade. All have the alternating orange and black pattern showing beyond the edge of the elytra (the forewings covering the back).
Photographed by: Éireann. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Singapore. Date: 11 July, 2019.
Tessaratomid stink bug (Piezosternum subulatum)
Tessaratomid stink bug, Piezosternum subulatum, subfamily Eucoriinae, family Tessaratomidae.
□ The photographer, who found this tessaratomid stink bug swimming next to him in a pool, and his wife provide an excellent description of this approximately 12 mm (0.5 inch) bug in the comments below.
Photographed by: Juraj Bajgar. Submitted by: Juraj’s wife Clara Bajgar. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: San Juan, Puerto Rico. Date: 17 January, 2019.
Clara says, “He picked it out, took it to his room and tried to take a photo, in artificial lighting. Apparently the bug is partly fluorescent green-blue and pretty. To me it looks like a Panzer WW2 tank that ran against a wall and lost his cannon.

Acanthosomatidae (the shield bugs)

Hawthorne shield bug (Acanthosoma haemorrhoidale)
Hawthorne shield bug, Acanthosoma haemorrhoidale, family Acanthosomatidae.
□ The hemmorrhoid reference in the scientific name (Acanthosoma haemorrhoidale) of this hawthorne shield bug refers to the reddish rear end. A favorite food of this bug is hawthorne-tree fruits, which is where it gets its common name. These images are frames captured from a video taken by the photographer, moments before the insect took flight and disappeared from view. See the top view in the next row.
Photographed by: Jim Seekers. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Edinburgh, Scotland. Date: 14 June, 2019.
Jim says he found this insect on the outside of his bedroom window.
Hawthorne shield bug (Acanthosoma haemorrhoidale)
Hawthorne Shield Bug, Acanthosoma haemorrhoidale, family Acanthosomatidae.
□ The hawthorne shield bug’s triangular-shaped pronotum has two spines, one at each “shoulder”. This is a characteristic of this species, in addition to the green and brown color pattern. See the underside view in the row above.
Photographed by: Val Watson. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Kintore Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Date: 10 September, 2019.
Val spotted it on the door outside her work.
Birch shield bug (Elasmostethus interstinctus)
Birch shield bug, fifth instar nymph (the last stage of an immature bug before becoming an adult), Elasmostethus interstinctus, family Acanthosomatidae.
□ As an adult, the birch shield bug is green splashed with red or brown — see the next photo. Note: At one time, this family was classified as a subfamily (Acanthosomatinae) of the family Pentatomatidae.
Photographed by: Jostein Håvard Kolnes. Identified by: Dr. Leslie Mertz. Location: Stavanger-area, Norway. Date: July, 2012.
Juniper shield bug (Cyphostethus tristriatus)
Juniper shield bug, Cyphostethus tristriatus, family Acanthosomatidae.
□ The juniper shield bug looks much like the birch shield bug (Elasmostethus interstinctus). The birch shield bug has “shoulders” that are extended and pointier, while those of the juniper shield bug are more rounded. In addition, the scutellum (the triangle-shaped shield in the middle of its back) is mainly green in the juniper shield bug, while it is has a splash of red in the birch shield bug. To compare the two species, click here.
Photographed and identified by: Bryan Wenham-Baker. Location: Near Ivybridge, South Hams, South Devon, England, UK. Date: 13 October, 2018.
Bryan describes it as “so colorful” and adds that it was about 1 cm (0.4 inch) long.
Juniper shield bug (Cyphostethus tristriatus)
Juniper shield bug, Cyphostethus tristriatus, family Acanthosomatidae.
□ The juniper shield bug feeds mainly on juniper berries, although it has also recently moved on to munching on Lawson’s cypress, according to BritishBugs.org.
□ The two slashes of color on this individual’s back are quite red, while other individuals may have a more toned-down brown color.
Photographed and identified by: Jean-Louis Metzger. Location: Oxford, UK. Date: 16 October, 2020.
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Scutelleridae (the metallic shield bugs or jewel bugs)

Scutellerid Shield Bug (Deroplax silphoides)
Scutellerid shield bug, Deroplax silphoides, subfamily Hoteinae, family Scutelleridae.
□ This scutellerid shield bug is quite new to Israel, where this photo was taken. In fact, the first one was reported only in 2002. According to a 2015 description, it was “first discovered in the southern Negev in 2002, Central Negev (Yeroham) in 2010, and in 2013 it spread to Be'er Sheva'.” It is native to the tropical areas of Africa.
Photographed by: Oleg Lisak. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: central Israel. Date: 23 July, 2021.
Lychee shield bug (Chrysocoris stollii)
Lychee shield bug, also known as green jewel bug, Chrysocoris stollii, subfamily Scutellerinae, family Scutelleridae.
□ From the top side, this lychee shield bug has black spots on a metallic-green body, and from the bottom, it is orange-red with black-spotted, metallic green at the edges.
□ This species has quite a bit of variability in the pattern and size of the black spots, and some even have hints of red here mixed in with the green metallic on the top (dorsal) side.
Photographed by: Ajay Antony. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Tamil Nadu, India. Date: 6 May, 2017.
Green Jewel Bug (Chrysocoris spp.)
Green jewel bug in the genus Chrysocoris, subfamily Scutellerinae, family Scutelleridae.
□ Several of the species in the genus Chrysocoris look quite similar. This appears to be the lychee shield bug with considerable black spotting.
Photographed by: K J Westman. Identified by: Audrey Maran. Location: Nitulemada, Digana, Rajawella, Kandy, Sri Lanka. Date: 31 December, 2014.
K J says, “I had a very good teacher in biology at school. He had travelled with the Swedish explorer Sven Hedin in Asia and I have ever after enjoyed the colors and patterns you find everywhere in nature.”
Metallic Shield Bug (Scutiphora pedicellata)
Metallic shield bugs, 4th or 5th instar nymph (immature), Scutiphora pedicellata, subfamily Scutellerinae, family Scutelleridae.
□ This group of metallic shield bug nymphs glimmer in green against that lovely rich-yellow background. The adults have green metallic on a black background, and sport a pair of orange spots behind the thorax, as well as orange trim around the edge of the thorax. To see the adult (and more photos of the nymph), click here.
Photographed and identified by: Ros Miller. Location: Sentinel Lookout Track, Cataract Gorge Reserve in Launceston, Tasmania. Date: 2017.
Ros says, “I thought it particularly interesting that the bugs appear to have a map of Tasmania on their back.”
Tea Seed Bugs, also known as Camillia Shield Bugs (Poecilocoris latus)
Tea seed bugs, also known as camillia shield bugs, nymphs (immature), Poecilocoris latus, subfamily Scutellerinae, family Scutelleridae.
□ The nymph of the tea seed bug is a pretty blend of orange-red, tan and cream. To see the adult, click here. They are pests of tea plants.
Photographed by: Senrita Raksam Marak. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: William Nagar, Meghalaya, India. Date: 25 June, 2019.
Shield-backed bug (Eurygaster amerinda)
Shield-backed bug, nymph (immature), possibly Eurygaster amerinda, subfamily Eurygastrinae, family Scutelleridae (the metallic shield bugs or jewel bugs).
□ This shield-backed bug nymph’s head is completely covered by its shield-like pronotum. A close inspection shows that it has V-shaped striping on the pronotum, as well as V-shaped striping (facing the opposite way) on its scutellum, which is the triangular-shaped shield in the middle of its back.
Photographed and identified to family by: Dianna Walter. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Pennock Mountain, outside of Saratoga, Wyoming, USA. Date: 7 July, 2018.

Pyrrhocoridae (the red bugs)

Firebug (Pyrrhocoris apterus)
Firebug, Pyrrhocoris apterus, subfamily Pyrrhocorinae, family Pyrrhocoridae.
□ Mating pairs of firebugs may remain connected (as this pair is) for up to seven days. The photographer took this photo during their mating season. One of the firebug’s favorite foods is the seeds of trees in the genus Tilia, which are called lime trees in Europe (where this one was photographed), and linden trees in the United States.
Photographed and identified by: K J Westman. Location: Hallsta, Gnesta, Sweden. Date: 15 April, 2018.
K J says she found others as well, and “They were they were clustered at the lower port of a lime-tree (Tilia).”
Firebug (Pyrrhocoris apterus)
Firebug, Pyrrhocoris apterus, nymph (immature), subfamily Pyrrhocorinae, family Pyrrhocoridae.
□ The photographer found numerous firebugs on headstones in a cemetery in Poland. These photos show the extent of the Firebug populations. A close look reveals both adults and their young, called nymphs. The nymphs have short, black “wing buds” instead of the longer wings of the adults (the adult wings are red with a black spot in the center). Although adult firebugs have longer wings than the nymphs, their wings are still are rather short, so they are not capable of flying. (See the photographer’s comments below to learn about the significance of this cemetery.)
Photographed by: Nomi Waksberg. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Szydlowiec, Poland. Date: Summer, 2018.
Nomi says, “I noticed what appeared to be a bug infestation on cemetery headstones while in Poland this summer. The headstones are made of limestone. They are historical and many are used in assisting genealogical research for family histories where there are no other records (destroyed in WWII).”
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Red cottonstainer bugs or Red Cotton Bugs (Dysdercus cingulatus)
Red cottonstainer bugs, adults and nymphs (immatures), Dysdercus cingulatus, subfamily Pyrrhocorinae, family Pyrrhocoridae.
□ This photo includes both the adults (one at the top and one at the lower right), and more than a dozen nymphs (immatures) of red cottonstainer bugs. Both adults and nymphs have a white “necklace” and a series of white markings along their sides. The nymphs have small, non-functional wing pads. The adults have two full wings (called hemelytra) that extend over the entire back of the insect — each hemelytron is split into two parts: the front portion is stiff and red with the single black dot, and the back portion is black and membranous.
Photographed by: Uday Prabhu. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India. Date: 13 September, 2018.
Uday says, “Looks like Iron Man in the insect kingdom.” KnowYourInsects says, “Great description, Uday!”
Red cottonstainer bugs or Red Cotton Bugs (Dysdercus cingulatus)
Red cottonstainer bugs, adults, Dysdercus cingulatus, subfamily Pyrrhocorinae, family Pyrrhocoridae.
Red cottonstainer bugs also sometimes come in this yellow body color instead of red (as in the previous photo.
□ The “cotton” part of their name arises because the adults and older nymphs (immatures) eat cotton seeds and cotton bolls. This transmits a fungus to the plant and the fungus actually stains the cotton. They also feed on many other plants, such as hibiscus, citrus, and teak trees.
Photographed by: Sravani Rayasam. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Kavali, Nellore District, India. Date: 15 January, 2020.
Cottonstainer bug or Red Cotton Bug (Probergrothius spp.)
Cottonstainer bug, nymph (immature), in the genus Probergrothius, subfamily Pyrrhocorinae, family Pyrrhocoridae.
□ Few photos of nymphs of this genus (Probergrothius) of cottonstainer bugs are available, which makes an identification problematic. It is longer and thinner than the nymphs in many species, and has a distinctive white tip on each antennae, a slight flare around the abdomen, and three black spots down the center of the abdomen. Note: This genus was formerly known as Odontopus.
Photographed by: Himashri Talukdar. Identified to genus by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Gangtok, India. Date: 30 August, 2019.

Largidae (the bordered plant bugs)

Largus bug (Largus succinctus)
Largus bug, Largus succinctus, subfamily Larginae, family Largidae.
□ The largus bug is one of the bugs in the “bordered plant bug” family, which refers to the thin, colored border on these otherwise dark insects. The border on the Largus Bug is usually reddish orange, as shown here, but it is yellow in some individuals.
Photographed by: Tim Pitner. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Rouge River, Oregon, USA. Date: 6 May, 2018.
Tim says, “There were thousands of these in my friend’s driveway on the day I visited. I’ve never seen one before and the orange matches the color of my truck! So of course, I had to take a photo … right?” KnowYourInsects says, “Absolutely!”
Bordered Plant Bug (Stenomacra marginella)
Bordered plant bug, Stenomacra marginella, subfamily Larginae, family Largidae.
□ The bordered plant bug shows a clear border around its folded wings, as well as a border around the thorax with a line down the middle, producing a bisected rectangle pattern. This individual has a light section at the front of its thorax, but this is not evident in all members of the species. The photographer described it as about 0.5 inches (1.3 cm) long
Photographed by: Mark Magers. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: near Lake Chapala in Jalisco, Mexico. Date: 26 June, 2021.
Mark says, “Spotted several of these fellows on my cherished chile pequin pepper plant in the backyard.”
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Belostomatidae (the giant water bugs)

Giant water bug (Belostomatidae)
Giant water bug, family Belostomatidae.
Giant water bugs are called giant because they are BIG! And yes, that ruler shows this Giant Water Bug is 2.5 inches long (that’s 6.25 cm). Quite an impressive beast!
Photographed by: Nick Dettorre. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Everett, Washington, USA. Date: 29 August, 2017.
Nick says, “My coworkers and I believe the water bug was a stowaway on one of several shipments we received from Florida.”
Giant water bug (Belostomatidae)
Giant water bug, family Belostomatidae.
□ KnowYourInsects.org loves the description of this giant water bug from the photographer (see below)
Photographed by: Tom Orvis. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Rochester Hills, Michigan, USA. Date: 12 May, 2018.
Tom says, “There is nothing in the picture for scale, but it’s about four inches long from head to tail. At first glance from 30 feet away, I thought it was a small turtle. It was crossing the road and I took a picture of it with an iPad. I have never seen an insect this large in Michigan.”
Giant water bug (Lethocerus spp.)
Giant water bug in the genus Lethocerus, subfamily Lethocerinae, family Belostomatidae.
Giant water bugs are sometimes called electric light bugs because they will fly to lights at night. See the comment by the identifier below.
□ The giant water bug’s forewings, called elytra (one is outlined in orange above), lay overlapped on its back. The elytra have a membranous section on one end, while the rest is harder and more opaque. The intricate veins of membranous section is clearly evident in this excellent photo. This two-part wing is a characteristic of this and other bugs in the order Hemiptera: Hemiptera literally means half-wing, a reference to this feature.
Photographed by: Jill Tribell. Identified to family by: Mark Stephens of Project F.I.S.H. Thank you, Mark! Identified to genus by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Haslett High School track, Haslett, Michigan, USA. Date: 27 October, 2020.
Mark says, “They are great entertainment during football games when they land on tbe crowd, lol.”
Giant water bug (Lethocerus cordofanus)
Giant water bug, Lethocerus cordofanus, subfamily Lethocerinae, family Belostomatidae.
□ The photographer found this giant water bug already dead. That explains why it is sitting so quietly on his hand!
Photographed by: Waleed Muhammad. Identified to family by: KnowYourInsects.org. Identified to species by: entomologist Nico Nieser of the Naturalis Biodiversity Centre in The Netherlands. Thank you, Dr. Nieser! Location: Cairo, Egypt. Date: 30 August, 2019.
Waleed says, “I found this insect dead and dry away from any water body in Cairo, Egypt.”
Giant water bug (Belostomatidae)
Giant water bug, family Belostomatidae.
□ The beefy front legs on this giant water buglook fearsome, but it is actually this insect’s “beak,” called a rostrum, that can inflict a deadly chomp to prey ... or a painful bite to a person’s toe. That explains why giant water bugs are sometimes called “toe-biters.”
Photographed by: Jimmy Dallas. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Panama City Beach, Florida, USA. Date: 15 September, 2016.
Giant water bug (Belostomatidae)
Giant water bug, family Belostomatidae.
□ Often, giant water bugs will rest on land with their front legs folded and their “elbows” splayed out (just like this one is doing). Interesting fact: A Giant Water Bug father will care for his young by carrying the eggs on his back — often dozens of them — until they hatch.
Photographed by: Terri Nelson. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Mississippi, USA. Date: 26 July, 2017.
Giant water bug (Belostomatidae)
Giant water bug, family Belostomatidae.
□ In the bottom photo, this giant water bug is showing off its defensive posture — forelegs up and looking tough!
Photographed by: Travis Green. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Carillon Historical Park, Dayton, Ohio, USA. Date: 15 June, 2018.
Travis says, “I was out walking the other night (around 10 p.m.) and stumbled across this ‘little’ guy.”
Giant water bug (Abedus spp.)
Giant water bug in the genus Abedus, family Belostomatidae.
□ The giant water bugs in this genus are sometimes called ferocious water bugs. The long “nose” on this individual is actually a much longer mouthpart that curves down underneath its body. The unseen part of hte mouthpart is long and sharp and can deliver a painful puncture.
Photographed and identified by: Hans Buer. Location: Leguan Island, Guyana, South America. Date: 24 August, 2020.
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Gerridae (the water striders)

Water strider (Gerridae)
Water strider, family Gerridae.
Water striders skate along the surface of the water, which is why they are sometimes called pond skaters. They can also tap down with their legs on the water surface to make ripples, and scientists believe they use these ripples to communicate with one another.
Photographed and identified by: Bryan Wenham-Baker. Location: Near Ivybridge, South Hams, South Devon, England, UK. Date: 4 September, 2017.
Bryan provided the list of common names this insect goes by: “Water Skater; Pond Skater; Water Skipper; Skimmer; Water Strider; and Jesus bug.” He adds that it took him a minute to get the Jesus bug reference — after all, this insect does walk on water!
Water strider (Limnogonus spp.)
Water strider in the genus Limnogonus, subfamily Gerrinae, family Gerridae.
□ Characteristic features of water striders include the long length of the middle and hind pairs of legs, and the much shorter front pair, which it holds out front so they look almost like a second set of antennae (albeit bent ones!). This one was found in Bihar India, which has two species in this genus: Limnogonus fossarum and Limnogonus nitidus.
Photographed by: Sunny Kumar Keshri. Location: Dumraon, Bihar, India. Date: early winter, 2019.
Sunny says he had never seen this type of insect in the area before.
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Nepidae (the water scorpions)

Water scorpion (Ranatra spp.)
Water scorpion, in the genus Ranatra, subfamily Ranatrinae, family Nepidae.
□ This water scorpion was about 3 inches long, and was in a river water sample collected by Mark Stephens for one one of the amazing activities in of his excellent Project F.I.S.H. programs at Michigan State University.
Photographed by: Leslie Mertz. Identified by: Mark Stephens. Location: River near Lansing, Michigan, USA. Date: 7 March, 2017.
Water scorpion (Laccotrephes spp.)
Water scorpion, in the genus Laccotrephes, subfamily Nepinae, family Nepidae.
□ These water scorpions look much like the giant water bugs of North America (which are shown here). In fact, in Sri Lanka (where this photo was taken), water scorpions are often called Giant Water Bugs.
Photographed by: K J Westman. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Nitulemada, Rajawella, Kandy, Sri Lanka Date: 17 May, 2016.
K J says, “Looking at these was like looking at some prehistoric creatures.”
Water scorpion (Laccotrephes spp.)
Water scorpion, in the genus Laccotrephes, subfamily Nepinae, family Nepidae.
□ Take a look at those amazing front legs and the beak — the water scorpion is a formidable predator!
Photographed by: K J Westman. Identified to family by: Audrey Maran. Tentatively identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Nitulemada, Rajawella, Kandy, Sri Lanka Date: 17 May, 2016.
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Water scorpion (Nepa cinerea)
Water scorpion, Nepa cinerea, subfamily Nepinae, family Nepidae.
□ One of the interesting features of the water scorpion is the long, tail-like siphon extending from its rear. The siphon consists of two pieces that come together to form a breathing tube (the pieces are together in the center photo and separated at right). This species has hairs on its abdomen, which trap a bubble of air from which the insect breathes. It uses the siphon to extend above the water’s surface and refill the bubble as necessary. Another feature of the Water Scorpion is the pair of the strong forelegs (seen at left). It uses its rear and center pairs of legs to cling to and hide among underwater vegetation and debris, and lashes out with its forelegs to ambush and capture prey.
Photographed by: Fafa Anczakski. Identified by: Joseph Botting. Thank you, Joe! Location: Newbiggen By The Sea in Northumberland, England, UK. Date: 31 July, 2018.
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Notonectidae (the backswimmers)

Grouse-Winged Backswimmer (Notonecta undulata)
Grouse-winged backswimmer, Notonecta undulata, subfamily Notonectinae, family Notonectidae.
□ The grouse-winged backswimmer and other backswimmer species actually swim upside down, often lying on their backs at the surface of the water and propelling themselves with a kick of their long hind legs (held out sideways in the photo here). They are often seen flying up (or leaping up) out of the water, which traps some air under their wings. The insect then uses that trapped air to breathe. The Grouse-Winged Backswimmer is a species of the western United States, but this individual was discovered in New York, so an unusual find!
Photographed by: Daniel Lewis. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Bethpage, Long Island, New York, USA. Date: 2 July, 2018.
Daniel says he found this one in his pool.
Backswimmer (Notonectidae)
Backswimmer, family Notonectidae.
Photographed by: Kerri Hill. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Swindon Wiltshire, England. Date: 23 August, 2018.
Backswimmer (Notonecta irrorata)
Backswimmer, Notonecta irrorata, subfamily Notonectinae, family Notonectidae.
□ This species of backswimmer gives off a chemical that repels mosquitos, so sharing a swimming pool with one can keep mosquitos from laying eggs there. On the other hand, backswimmers do bite and it can be painful, so it’s best not to come into direct contact with one. See the photographer’s comment below about backswimmers in a pool.
Photographed and identified to order by: Steven M. Nassor. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Massachusetts, USA. Date: 16 October, 2018.
Steven says he found several of these backswimmers when he was closing the swimming pool for the year. He says, “Just noticed them after the weather changed. We didn’t close the pool right away and left it with no maintenance. A few weeks later when topping the pool off, we were vacumming some leaves and began to notice several of them.”
Backswimmer naiad (Notonecta spp.)
Backswimmer in the genus Notonecta, naiad (immature), subfamily Notonectinae, family Notonectidae.
Photographed by: Frank O’Regan. Identified by: entomologist John E. McPherson, professor emeritus of Southern Illinois University. Thank you, Dr. McPherson! Location: Glatane County, Cork, Ireland. Date: 15 September, 2016.
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Corixidae (the water boatmen)

Water boatmen (Trichocorixa louisianae)
Water boatmen in the genus Trichocorixa, possibly Trichocorixa louisianae, subfamily Corixinae, family Corixidae.
Water boatmen are closely related to —and look much like— backswimmers in the family Notonectidae, including the part of long hind legs and big eyes. A big difference is that water boatmen swim right side up, while backswimmers swim upside down. Several species of water boatmen in Cuba, where this photo was taken, have the horizontal wavy pattern seen here.
□ A nice list of the aquatic species in Cuba is available here.
Photographed by: Tyler Oberding. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Las Tunas, Cuba. Date: 9 January, 2021.
Tyler described this as “a weird bug I saw on a countertop.”
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Lygaeidae (the milkweed bugs and seed bugs)

Milkweed bugs (Oncopeltus fasciatus)
Large milkweed bugs,
nymphs (immatures), Oncopeltus fasciatus, subfamily Lygaeinae, family Lygaeidae.
□ These are nymphs (immatures) of large milkweed bugs. See the adult in the next photos.
Photographed by: Susan Barron. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Frenchtown, New Jersey, USA. Date: 18 September, 2016.
Susan found these nymphs on butterfly weed, which is a kind of milkweed plant with beautiful orange flowers.
Large Milkweed Bug (Oncopeltus fasciatus)
Large milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus, subfamily Lygaeinae, family Lygaeidae.
Large milkweed bugs are often much more deeply orange-red than this specimen.
□ They feed on milkweed, and like many other insects that eat that plant, they pick up distasteful chemicals (called cardiac glycosides) that make the insects distasteful to birds that might swoop down to eat them. The bright orange-red color reinforces to potential predators that they taste bad, and therefore helps to protect them from being eaten.
Photographed by: Diane Cagle. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Marietta, Georgia, USA. Date: 2 August, 2019.
Diane says, “I found this little creature on my hummingbird feeder.”
Large Milkweed Bug (Oncopeltus fasciatus)
Large milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus, subfamily Lygaeinae, family Lygaeidae.
Large milkweed bugs have backs with a distinctive pattern: a large black patch, followed by a broad black horizontal band and then a second large black patch. As seen in this nice close-up photo, the head is adorned with reddish-orange “V”.
Photographed and identified to order by: Margaret Minor. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Balboa Park Gardens, San Diego. Date: 31 July, 2019.
Large Milkweed Bug (Oncopeltus fasciatus)
Large milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus, subfamily Lygaeinae, family Lygaeidae.
□ This photo captures a large milkweed bug with its wings outstretched shows off its bright orange abdomen, a feature most people rarely see.
Photographed by: Terry Bates. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Wilbuton, Oklahoma. Date: 8 August, 2020.
Terry saw this large milkweed bug on a windy day in the garden. She says, “That is the first time I’ve seen a milkweed bug.”
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Soldier Bug (Spilostethus pandurus)
Soldier bug, also known as a milkweed bug, adult and nymph (immature), Spilostethus pandurus, subfamily Lygaeinae, family Lygaeidae.
□ The photographer was diligent, because he not only photographed the nymph (right) of this soldier bug, but later went back to find the adult. The nymph of the Solider Bug has two noticeably white-ringed black spots on its abdomen. The adult is distinguished by the pattern of black and white spots on its elytra (the wings covering its abdomen).
□ Note: Check the scientific name of any species commonly called a “milkweed bug”, as a number of red-and-black species are sometimes called milkweed bugs.
Photographed by: Hussain Alsalem. Identified by: entomologist Bertrand Horne, research fellow, Kutch Ecological Research Centre, a unit of The Corbett Foundation, Kutch, Gujarat, India. Thank you, Dr. Horne! Location: Najran City, Saudi Arabia. Date: 30, April 2018 (for the nymph), and 18 May, 2018 (for the adult).
Hussain says neither he (nor his mother) had ever seen these insects before, but found hundreds of the nymphs near home.
Soldier Bug (Spilostethus pandurus)
Soldier bug, also known as a milkweed bug, male, Spilostethus pandurus, subfamily Lygaeinae, family Lygaeidae.
□ This species of soldier bug is considered an agricultural pest because it eats a variety of crop seeds, including sunflower, watermelon, squash and cantaloupe seeds.
Photographed and identified to order by: Jean-Louis Metzger. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Oxford, England, UK. Date: 5 August, 2017.
Jean-Louis estimated it at 8-10 mm (0.3-04 inches) in length.
Soldier Bug (Spilostethus pandurus)
Soldier bug, also known as a milkweed bug, female, Spilostethus pandurus, subfamily Lygaeinae, family Lygaeidae.
□ The female soldier bug in this species has a beige blotch and thin red stripe behind the head, as seen here. The male has a red diamond instead of the beige blotch.
Photographed by: Yanni Petropoulos. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: mainland of southwest Greece. Date: 19 April, 2020.
Yanni says, “As a kid growing, I have seen so many of this particular insect, but what struck me is it now looks a bit different from what I remember them as a child.”
Darth Maul Bug (Spilostethus hospes)
Large milkweed bug, Spilostethus hospes, subfamily Lygaeinae, family Lygaeidae.
□ The large milkweed bug, which has been called a darth maul bug on one website, feeds on the seeds of milkweed plants, and is often found on these plants. It does, however, also eat seeds of other plants, including tomatoes and plants in the genus Euphorbia. The photographer reports that he found this one on a fireplant (Euphorbia heterophylla) during a field trip to the Solomon Islands, which lie in the Pacific Ocean off the northeast coast of Australia.
Photographed by: Chris Simon. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Solomon Islands. Date: 3 November, 2020.
Seed Bug (Melacoryphus rubicollis)
Seed bug, Melacoryphus rubicollis, subfamily Lygaeinae, family Lygaeidae.
□ This seed bug can be identified by the red collar and red-edged shoulders. A closely related species looks rather similar, but the red at the shoulders continues much farther down its sides, and it also has a red blotch in the center-rear of its pronotum (the shield covering its thorax).
Photographed by: Beverly McDonald. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: central Arizona, USA (see note below). Date: 25 April, 2020.
Beverly says, “Since the bug came out of pair of shorts at Walmart, it could have traveled from anywhere.”
False Milkweed Bug (Lygaeus turcicus)
False milkweed bug, nymph, Lygaeus turcicus, subfamily Lygaeinae, family Lygaeidae.
□ This nymph of a false milkweed bug looks almost identical to a small milkweed bug (Lygaeus kalmii). Both have two large black spots in the middle of the abdomen, but the small milkweed bug nymph has an additional row of smaller black spots on either side of the two large spots, as shown by clicking here.
□ A great story about the confusion between the false milkweed bug and the small milkweed bug is available by clicking here.
Photographed and identified to genus by: Christopher Barger. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: East Tennessee, USA. Date: 15 August, 2020.
Nettle ground bug (Heterogaster urticae)
Nettle ground bug, nymphs, Heterogaster urticae, subfamily Heterogastrinae, family Lygaeidae.
□ Nymphs of nettle ground bugs may be green or reddish (as seen here) and have a row of black spots down the center of the abdomen, which sometimes blend together to look more like a black line. The adults are brown or gray with a row of small white dots running along the outside of the abdomen.
□ The species name of the nettle ground bug is urticae. This refers to its host plant: the nettle, which is in the genus Urtica. Th
Photographed and identified by: Eric Eddles. Location: Baffins Pond, Portsmouth, England, UK. Date: 11 August, 2020.
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Seed Bug (Nysius spp.)
Seed bug in the genus Nysius, subfamily Orsillinae, family Lygaeidae.
□ The large eyes, the antennae, and the swollen nature of the forelegs on this seed bug led Dr. H.M. Yeshwanth, an entomologist at the University of Agricultural Sciences in Bangalore, India, to tentatively identify this as a member of the genus Nysius. Without a clearer photo, however, he cannot rule out a different genus in this family, or possibly a species in the Geocoridae family (known as the big-eyed bugs) or maybe even the Coreidae family (the leaf-footed bugs).
Photographed by: Siddanth Sanil. Identified by: entomologist Dr. H.M. Yeshwanth of the University of Agricultural Sciences in Bangalore, India. Thank you, Dr. Yeshwanth! Location: Bangalore, India. Date: 9 December, 2017.
Siddanth says, “I found this insect in my hostel room in Bangalore, India. It’s grey in colour and is tiny and calm.”
Seed Bug (Nysius spp.)
Seed bug in the genus Nysius, possibly Nysius ericae or Nysius thymi, subfamily Orsillinae, family Lygaeidae.
□ Like many seed bugs, this one has an oval silhouette and a triangular-shaped head with eyes positioned at two of the triangle’s corners.
Photographed by: Patrik Jano. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Leeds, England, UK. Date: 14 August, 2019.
False Chinch Bug (Nysius spp.)
Seed bug in the genus Nysius, possibly False Chinch Bug, Nysius raphanus, subfamily Orsillinae, family Lygaeidae.
□ The nymphs (immatures) of this genus are difficult to tell apart. This one may be a nymph of a false chinch bug (different from a true chinch bug, which is posted here). False chinch bugs are pests in different mustard plants, sucking up the plant juices and harming the plants. For more information about false chinch bugs, click here.
Photographed by: Fred Jepson. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Maricopa, Arizona, USA. Date: 4 April, 2020.

Rhopalidae (the scentless plant bugs)

Scentless plant bug (Rhopalus subrufus)
Scentless plant bug, Rhopalus subrufus, subfamily Rhopalinae, family Rhopalidae.
□ This scentless plant bug has a rust-red thorax, hemelytra (forewings) with rust-red and black-speckled areas, and a alternating black and white markings on the edge of its abdomen. to Although it is not evident unless the specimen is in hand, this species has a number of short hairs covering its body, including its legs.
Photographed and identified to family by: Jean-Louis Metzger. Nice job on the ID, Jean-Louis! Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Oxford, England, UK. Date: 15 July, 2019.
Scentless seed bug (Arhyssus scutatus)
Scentless Seed Bug, possibly Arhyssus scutatus, subfamily Rhopalinae, family Rhopalidae.
Photographed by: Monica Isaza. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Utah, USA. Date: 29 June, 2016.
Monica says, “I am not sure if they fly or just jump, (but) when I am in the garage or close to where they are, I always get a few on myself.”
Red-shouldered bug (Jadera haematoloma)
Red-Shouldered Bug, also known as a Jadera Bug, nymph (immature), Jadera haematoloma, subfamily Serinethinae, family Rhopalidae.
□ The nymphs of red and black milkweed bugs look similar, but have rows of black dots down the abdomen. When the nymph of the Red-Shouldered Bug becomes an adult, black wings will cover the abdomen.
Photographed by: Shelley. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Los Angeles, California. Date: 8 November, 2016.
Shelley says, “And they are in massive numbers — hundreds of them. All different stages!”
Box elder bug (Boisea trivittata)
Box Elder Bug, Boisea trivittata, subfamily Serinethinae, family Rhopalidae.
□ Check out that handsome red and black pattern! The box elder bug is not tasty to predators, and the red color helps to let predators know that they should find a meal elsewhere. A side note: When the weather turns cold, groups of box elder bugs will congregate someplace warm, occasionally in houses.
Photographed by: Sarah Zolynsky. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Canton, Michigan, USA. Date: 6 October, 2016.
Box elder bug (Boisea trivittata)
Box Elder Bug, Boisea trivittata, subfamily Serinethinae, family Rhopalidae.
□ The Box Elder Bug is sometimes known by the common name of a Maple Bug, and in those areas where they become common at election time, they are also known as Democrat Bugs, Populist Bugs or Politician Bugs. Its species name of trivittata literally means three stripes, and refers to the central and two side stripes on its prothorax.
Photographed by: Ron Wilder. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Liverpool, New York, USA. Date: 8 November, 2016.
Box elder bug (Boisea trivittata)
Box Elder Bug, Boisea trivittata, subfamily Serinethinae, family Rhopalidae.
□ This is the underside of the previous photo—still red and black, but a different pattern.
Photographed by: Ron Wilder. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Liverpool, New York, USA. Date: 8 November, 2016.
Ron says, “Over 100 of them were on the siding of my house and the garage door, like they were basking in the bright, warm sun of that day.”
Box elder bug (Boisea trivittata)
Box Elder Bug, nymph (immature), Boisea trivittata, subfamily Serinethinae, family Rhopalidae.
□ Immature Box Elder Bugs, like this nymph, are often found in large groups. Nymphs go through five stages, or instars, becoming darker and darker red with each passing instar. The black wing buds (too undeveloped for flight) become longer at each stage. This nymph is probably a fifth instar, and with the next molt, it will become an adult (as shown in the previous photo).
Photographed by: Craig Bierman. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: western New Jersey, USA. Date: 14 July, 2018.
Box Elder Bugs nymphs (Boisea trivittata)
Box Elder Bugs, nymphs (immatures), Boisea trivittata, subfamily Serinethinae, family Rhopalidae.
□ The original photo shows dozens and dozens of these insects; we zoomed in on a few of them here. They closely resemble Large Milkweed Bug nymphs.
Photographed by and identified as nymphs by: Craig Olson. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Worcester, Massachusetts, USA. Date: 18 September, 2016.
Craig says, “Never seen them before. Wondering if it is a nymph stage of something.” KnowYourInsects replies, “Craig are correct! They are nymphs!”
Scentless Plant Bug nymphs (Niesthrea louisianica)
Scentless Plant Bugs, nymphs (immatures), Niesthrea louisianica, subfamily Rhopalinae, family Rhopalidae.
□ With their white checkers and orange heads, these Scentless Plant Bug nymphs are quite attractive. The adults are also handsome. (To see the adult, click here.) Both the nymphs and the adults eat the seeds of plants in the mallow family, and that includes Rose of Sharon, which is where these bugs were photographed.
Photographed by: Kaye Stone. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Bolivar, Polk County, Missouri, USA. Date: 9 October, 2019.
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Rhyparochromidae (the dirt-colored seed bugs)

Long-Necked Seed Bug (Myodocha serripes)
Long-Necked Seed Bug, Myodocha serripes, subfamily Rhyparochrominae, family Rhyparochromidae.
□ One of this long-naked seed bug’s favorite seeds are those of strawberries, so they can occasionally be a pest of these fruits. This insect only grows to about 1 cm (3/8 inch) long. Note: The family Rhyparochromidae was once listed as a subfamily under the family Lygaeidae, and is sometimes still listed that way.
Photographed by: Alex Pendjurin. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Washington, USA. Date: 18 May, 2017.
Long-Necked Seed Bug (Myodocha spp.)
Long-necked seed bug in the genus Myodocha, subfamily Rhyparochrominae, family Rhyparochromidae.
□ The long neck on this long-necked seed bug is very distinctive for this genus. Note: The family Rhyparochromidae was once listed as a subfamily under the family Lygaeidae, and is sometimes still listed that way.
Photographed by: Rochelle Koehler. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Allentown, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: spring or summer, 2019.
Rochelle says, “There were quite a few of them crawling along the concrete foundation in the back of my house in one area. They barely moved.”
Dirt-colored Seed Bug (Scolopostethus spp.)
Dirt-colored Seed Bug in the genus Scolopostethus, possibly Scolopostethus pictus, subfamily Rhyparochrominae, family Rhyparochromidae.
□ A common feature of this family of insects is the enlarged femur (“thigh”) of the front legs. This group also has antennae with four segments. This dirt-colored seed bug has both: the enlarged femur and four-segmented antennae. Note: The family Rhyparochromidae was once listed as a subfamily under the family Lygaeidae, and is sometimes still listed that way.
Photographed by: Kimberly Alvites. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: London, England, UK. Date: 18 September, 2019.
Kimberly snapped this photo in her kitchen, where a group of these little insects had decided to pay a visit.
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Miridae (the plant bugs, leaf bugs, and grass bugs)

Plant Bug, Miridae
Plant bug, family Miridae.
□ The exact species of this plant bug is unknown. If you can identify this bug, which was photographed in Costa Rica, let us know!
Photographed by: Todd Hawley. Identified to family by: Lee P. Guillebeau, an entomologist at the University of Georgia (thank you, Lee!). Location: Costa Rica. Date: December, 2015.
Alfalfa Plant Bug (Adelphocoris lineolatus)
Alfalfa plant bug, Adelphocoris lineolatus, subfamily Mirinae, family Miridae.
Photographed by: Jostein Håvard Kolnes. Identified by: Dr. Bernard S. Nau. Location: Stavanger-area, Norway. Date: 13 August, 2012.
Grass Bug or Meadow Plant Bug (Leptopterna dolabrata)
Grass bug (also known as a meadow plant bug), Leptopterna dolabrata, fifth instar nymph, subfamily Mirinae, family Miridae.
Photographed by: Jostein Håvard Kolnes. Identified by: Dr. Bernard S. Nau. Location: Stavanger-area, Norway. Date: 31 July, 2011.
Tarnished Plant Bug (Lygus lineolaris)
Tarnished plant bug, fifth instar nymph, Lygus lineolaris, subfamily Mirinae, family Miridae.
□ As the nymphs of the tarnished plant bug grow older — from first instar nymphs to fifth instar nymphs (the last stage before becoming an adult) — they gain more spots and also develop wing buds. This fifth instar nymph has four spots on its thorax, one more in the center of its abdomen, and wing buds. For more information about this species, click here.
Photographed by: Daisy Rulz. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Mayville, Michigan, USA. Date: 26 August, 2017.
Tarnished Plant Bug (Lygus pratensis)
Mirid plant bug, quite possibly a tarnished plant bug species Lygus pratensis, subfamily Mirinae, family Miridae.
□ This tarnished plant bug shows the heart shape in the center of its back, which is characteristic of this species. The overall color of individuals in this species ranges from beige to dark brown, and many have light-colored patches on the tips of their wings (but not this one!).
Photographed by: Dave Johnson. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: England. Date: 26 June, 2020.
Plant Bug (Lygus spp.)
Plant bug, also known as a lygus bug, in the genus Lygus, subfamily Mirinae, family Miridae.
□ This nice series of photos shows different angles of this plant bug, including its long beak (lower right photo). Lygus Bugs have become pest insects in Canada, where these photos were taken.
Photographed by: Terry Paulhus. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Calgary, Canada. Date: 7 August, 2018.
Two-spotted Grass Bug (Stenotus binotatus)
Two-spotted grass bug, Stenotus binotatus, subfamily Mirinae, family Miridae.
□ This two-spotted grass bug has a pair of large black spots on its pronotum (the shield covering its thorax). The dark striping on its back may be lighter or darker in some individuals. It is native to Europe, but is now found in North America.
Photographed and identified by: Denise Rulason. Location: Mayville, Michigan, USA. Date: 24 June, 2018.
Tarnished Plant Bug (Grypocoris stysi)
Mirid plant bug, Grypocoris stysi, subfamily Mirinae, family Miridae.
□ This mirid plant bug is black with a distinctive pattern of yellowish markings, including those in the center of its back (see the comment below). The large markings on on the back half of each hemelytra (the two forewings) may be orange in some individuals. This bug eats aphids, so it is considered a friend to gardeners.
□ This species is sometimes listed under its former genus name of Calocoris.
Photographed by: Pascal Stil. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Belfast, Ireland. Date: 23 June, 2020.
Pascal says, “I was out for a walk today and took some pictures of flowers, and in one I spotted this insect, the most characteristic thing appears to be what looks like a letter N on its back.”
Potato Capsid (Closterotomus norwegicus)
Potato capsid, Closterotomus norwegicus, subfamily Mirinae, family Miridae.
□ This wonderful close-up of a potato capsid shows the two tiny black spots on the pronotum (the shield covering its thorax), but not all members of this species have them. According to British Bugs, two characteristic features of this insect are: 1) the length of its antennal segments — the second segment is longest, and about the length of the last two segments combined; and 2) the spines on its tibia (the “shin”) are short, less than the width of the tibia.
Photographed and identified by: Bryan Wenham-Baker. Location: Near Ivybridge, South Hams, South Devon, England, UK. Date: 9 June, 2018.
Grass Bug (Stenodema laevigatum)
Grass bug, Stenodema laevigatum, subfamily Mirinae, family Miridae.
□ This grass bug has muted brown lines on a lighter yellow-brown (occasionally light-green) background, and has no spines on its hind-leg femur. This sets it apart from fellow species in the Stenodema genus, which look quite similar but do have spines on the hind-leg femur.
Photographed and identified by: Jean-Louis Metzger. Nice job, Jean-Louis! Location: Oxford, England, UK. Date: 5 August, 2017.
Plant Bug (Deraeocoris spp.)
Plant bug in the genus Deraeocoris, subfamily Deraeocorinae, family Miridae.
□ Entomologist Fedor V. Konstantinov identified plant bug as either Deraeocoris serenus or Deraeocoris punctulatus (punctulatus means “with dots”, referring to the two light-colored spots toward the rear of its back). Most of the species in this genus are predaceous on other insects: Deraeocoris punctulatus preys on aphids; and Deraeocoris serenus preys on whiteflies.
□ These plant bugs are sometimes erroneously called dirt-colored seed bugs, but that name is reserved for bugs in the family Rhyparochromidae.
Photographed by: Emily Poole. Identified to family by: entomologist Wenjun Bu of Nankai University in China. Identified to genus by: entomologist Fedor V. Konstantinov of St. Petersburg State University in Russia. Thank you, Dr. Wenjun and Dr. Konstantinov! Location: Košice Am, Slovenia. Date: 4 September, 2019.
Red Mountain Laurel Mirid (Stenodema laevigatum)
Red mountain laurel mirid in the genus Lopidea, quite possibly Lopidea major, subfamily Orthotylinae, family Miridae.
□ The red mountain laurel mirid feeds on the plant called Texas mountain laurel (Sophora secundiflora). This species is only found in a small area of Texas, but in the late spring/early summer when they are out feeding and laying eggs, their populations can get quite large.
Photographed and identified to order by: Manzeal Khanal. Identified to genus and tentative species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: San Antonio, Texas, USA. Date: 23 March, 2020.
Manzeal says he saw many of these bugs on Texas mountain laurel in the parking lot of the La Cantera shopping mall. This one is sitting on cactus near some laurel trees.
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Blissidae (the chinch bugs)
Nabidae (the damsel bugs)

Chinch Bug (Blissus leucopterus)
Chinch Bug, nymph, Blissus leucopterus, subfamily Blissinae, family Blissidae.
□ This immature chinch bug looks like a 4th instar nymph — the chinch bugs go through five stages, or instars, before becoming an adult. Most people notice the lawn damage — small to large brown patches — before seeing the tiny chinch bugs themselves. For more about chinch bugs, which can also be found in grassy fields, click here.
Photographed by: David Miller. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Milton, Ontario, Canada. Date: 24 July, 2020.
David says, “They seem to like the sun as well as they are not really in the shade. My backyard is infested with these tiny bugs.”
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Damsel Bug (Nabis spp.)
Damsel bug in the genus Nabis, subfamily Nabinae, family Nabidae.
Damsel bugs catch their prey — other soft-bodied insects, such as cutworms, aphids, and other garden pests — with their front legs, similar to the way mantises will grab prey. Overall, they are good to have in the garden since they kill pests.
Photographed by: MaryJane Griblin. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: West Sacramento, California, USA. Date: 5 September, 2019.
MaryJane says, “You may share the photo of the interesting Damsel Bug as I’m sure this will contribute to the continuing fascination and curiosity that we have of so many variety of cool bugs.”

Tingidae (the lace bugs)

Chrysanthemum Lace Bug (Corythucha marmorata)
Lace bug in the genus Corythucha, possibly Chrysanthemum Lace Bug, Corythucha marmorata, subfamily Tinginae, family Tingidae.
Lace bugs do indeed have lace-like veining in their wings, as seen here. Species are often distinguished by the specific types of vegetation they prefer: This one was seen in a wetland filled with waist-high plants, and Chrysanthemum Lace Bugs are sometimes found in areas with wet soils.
Photographed by: Paul Cheng. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: St. Paul, Minnesota, USA. Date: 6 July, 2019.
He says, “I just want to know what this beautiful insect is.”
Hawthorn Lace Bug or Hazelnut Lace Bug (Corythucha cydoniae or Corythucha coryli)
Lace bug in the genus Corythucha, possibly a hawthorn lace bug, Corythucha cydoniae, or a hazelnut lace bug, Corythucha coryli, subfamily Tinginae, family Tingidae.
□ This lace bug appears to be either a hawthorn lace bug (Corythucha cydoniae) or a hazelnut lace bug (Corythucha coryli).
Photographed by: Sharon Gewain. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: central North Carolina, USA. Date: 29 August, 2019.
After finding out what it was, Sharon says, “My daughter took the insect on Scotch tape to work and looked at it under a microscope. She said the lacy wings were visible.” KnowYourInsects.org says, “Cool!”
Walnut Lace Bug  or Buckeye Lace Bug (Corythucha juglandis or Corythucha aesculi)
Lace bug in the genus Corythucha, probably either a walnut lace bug, Corythucha juglandis, or buckeye lace bug, Corythucha aesculi, subfamily Tinginae, family Tingidae.
□ This lace bug appears to be either a walnut lace bug or a buckeye lace bug (Corythucha juglandis or Corythucha aesculi, respectively). Often, the identification can be assisted by the type of tree where it is found, but the location of this one was no help — see the photographer’s comment below to see why.
Photographed by: Chelsea Hayman. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Delaware, Ohio, USA. Date: 16 October, 2019.
Chelsea says, “I found this bug on a pair of socks from Walmart yesterday.”
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Sycamore Lace Bug (Corythucha ciliata)
Sycamore lace bug, Corythucha ciliata, subfamily Tinginae, family Tingidae.
□ The sycamore lace bug has wide, lace-like wings and extensions on its thorax, as well as tiny tooth-like projections at the edges (just visible in these views of the underside and topside of Sycamore Lace Bugs.
□ While this species usually feeds on plant sap, research reports (hereclick here for one of the reports) from Europe indicate that it will also bite people, and some have a bad reaction to the bite: See the photographer’s comment below.
Photographed by: Harry Harm. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Oradea, Romania. Date: 5 August, 2020.
Harry says, “This summer I have been getting bites, but did not know from what. I was thinking that we had noseeums here like I encountered when I lived in Cyprus (but then saw) thousands of small insects that look like this.”
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Cicadidae (the cicadas)

Bush Cicada (Megatibicen dorsatus)
Bush cicada, Megatibicen dorsatus, family Cicadidae.
□ This bush cicada is quite dashing in black and brown. Note: The genus name was previously named Neotibicen.
Photographed and identified to order by: Nicole Burgoz. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Pampa, Gray County, Texas, USA. Date: 26 August, 2015.
Dog Day Cicada (Megatibicen canicularis)
Dog day cicada, Megatibicen canicularis, family Cicadidae.
□ The dog day cicada gets its name because it sings — a high-pitched sh-sh-sh noise — during the height or — dog days — of summer. (They are actually called dog days because it is the time of year when the constellation Canis Major (which translates to “the big dog”), is prominent in the northern night sky.)
□ The genus name was previously Neotibicen.
Photographed by: Reginald Willis. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: The Michigan Urban Farming Initiative, Detroit, Michigan, USA. Date: 9 August, 2019.
Ash Cicada (Cicada orni)
Ash dicada, Cicada orni, family Cicadidae.
□ Note the wonderful camouflage on this ash cicada, which was photographed on a tree trunk in Greece.
Photographed by: Philip Cope. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Greek island of Kos. Date: 21 September, 2019.
Scissor-grinder cicada (Neotibicen winnemanna)
Scissor-grinder cicada, also known as a swamp cicada or morning cicada, Neotibicen winnemanna, family Cicadidae.
□ The scissor-grinder cicada has a song with short bursts that rise in amplitude. To hear the song of this cicada, click here. Individuals in this species have quite a bit of variation in the amount of black and green on the thorax — this one has a handsome mix!
Photographed by: Jessica Williams. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Powell, Ohio, USA. Date: 11 August, 2020.
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Annual Cicada (Neotibicen linnei)
Linne’s annual cicada, Neotibicen linnei, family Cicadidae.
□ The name cicada means buzzer in Latin. This makes sense, because cicadas make a quite loud and high-pitched buzzing sound. Compare the song of Linne’s annual cicada and other species by clicking here.
□ The characteristic green leading edge on each of the otherwise clear wings of this Annual Cicada is clearly visible in these photo. The left photo also shows a bit of the straw-like mouthparts (it looks rather like a brown, pointy chin). The cicada uses its mouthparts to drink plant sap during its brief life as an adult.
Photographed and identified by: Matthew Woods. Location: Ypsilanti, Washtenaw County, Michigan, USA. Date: 8 September, 2013.
Linne's annual cicada (Neotibicen linnei)
Linne’s annual cicada, Neotibicen linnei, family Cicadidae.
□ These views of an Linne’s annual cicada show details that are often missed: the small, threadlike antennae, the grill-like clypeus (the section at the front of its face), the white markings on its abdomen, and the small black smudges on its wings.
Photographed and identified to family by: Laura Saaf. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Chicago, Illinois, USA. Date: 14 August, 2020.
Laura says, “Last night, a slow-moving cicada very sweetly allowed me to bring it indoors and take some fairly good shots.”
Annual Cicada (Tibicen linnei)
Linne’s annual cicada, Neotibicen linnei, family Cicadidae.
Photographed and identified by: Norine Nichols. Location: Sterling Heights, Michigan, USA. Date: 18 September, 2016.
Norine says, “I never realized how colorful there were. You hear them, but rarely see them.” She adds, “I just saved this guy from a container with water in it. He is drying out on my deck.” Way to go, Norine!
Annual Cicada (Tibicen linnei)
Linne’s annual cicada, Neotibicen linnei, family Cicadidae.
Photographed and identified by: Aaron Fortin. Location: Sterling Heights, Michigan, USA. Date: 14 August, 2018.
Annual Cicada (Tibicen linnei)
Linne’s annual cicada, Neotibicen linnei, family Cicadidae.
□ This series of photos reveals the metamorphosis of a Linne’s annual cicada. The left photo is the last molt, as the back of the nymph has split open and the adult is emerging. The spent casing is called exuviae, and is left behind. The center photo shows one of its wings, which looks almost like a thick hind leg. The last photo shows the wings expanded. As its body dries over the few hours, it will take on its adult coloration (see in the previous line).
Photographed by: Anonymous. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Saginaw County, Michigan, USA. Date: 26 July, 2016.
Annual Cicada (Tibicen linnei)
Linne’s annual cicada, Neotibicen linnei, family Cicadidae.
□ This is the adult Linne’s annual cicada that resulted from the metamorphosis shown on the next line.
Photographed by: Anonymous. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Saginaw County, Michigan, USA. Date: 26 July, 2016.
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Cicada, Cicadidae
Cicada, pupa, family Cicadidae.
□ Once the photographer found out what it was, he and his friends continued watching the cicada pupa, and were able to witness its metamorphosis into an adult. See comments below.
Photographed and identified by: Derrick Maia. Location: Chelmsford, Massachusetts, USA. Date: 1 August, 2016.
Derrick and his friends took a video of the metamorphosis and sent it in — and it included some colorful commentary from the young men. With the video, Derrick cautioned, “Sorry for the swears in the video. Very cool stuff. Set it free in a tree!” KnowYourInsects.org says :-D
Cicada, Cicadidae
Cicada, family Cicadidae.
□ The green wing veins really stand out against the silvery tint of this cicada.
Photographed and identified by: Kim Minard. Location: Seeleys Bay, Ontario, Canada. Date: 1 August, 2020.
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Fulgoridae (the fulgorid planthoppers)

Spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula)
Spotted lanternfly, Lycorma delicatula, family Fulgoridae.
□ This is the adult spotted lanternfly (the nymphs are posted elsewhere on this page). The photographer of this shot notes that it “has a bright red-and-white underwing pattern when it flies.” As noted in other postings, if you are in the United States or Canada, report sightings of this insect. (Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture).
Photographed by: Kelly McKinne (@gonzonaturalist). Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Exeter Township, outside of Reading, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 12 September, 2017.
Kelly says, “These are all over my parking lot at work today.” KnowYourInsects.org says, “Yikes!”
Spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula)
Spotted lanternfly, Lycorma delicatula, family Fulgoridae.
□ This adult spotted lanternfly looks much different than it does when it is younger (see other entries). Whether it is an adult or nymph, if you are in the United States or Canada, report sightings of this grape pest (Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture).
□ A beautiful insect, the adult spotted lanternfly is a pest of cultivated grapes, apples, other fruits, and hardwood trees. A native of China, India and Vietnam, it was first discovered in the United States in 2014.
Photographed by: Dana Weddle. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Verified by: Dr. Julie Urban at Penn State. Location: Maple Grove Raceway, Mohnton, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 24 September, 2017.
Spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula)
Spotted lanternfly, Lycorma delicatula, family Fulgoridae.
□ This adult spotted lanternfly has its wings spread to show off the vibrant red of its hind wings.
Photographed by: Molli Crowl. Submitted by: Stephanie Hardy. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Hagerstown, Maryland, USA. Date: 24 October, 2020.
Spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula)
Spotted lanternfly, nymph, Lycorma delicatula, family Fulgoridae.
□ The spotted lanternfly goes through stages, or instars, before becoming an adult. During the first three instars, it is black with white spots, as shown here. The fourth instar is red with black markings and white spots (as seen in the next photo).
Left photo by: Don Everett. Location: east coast of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 4 July, 2020.
Right photo by: Sharon Finger. Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 10 June, 2020. Both identified by: KnowYourInsects.org.
Sharon says, “It looks like a round tick from the side view and it crawls really fast...leaps far too.”
Spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula)
Spotted lanternfly, 4th instar nymph, Lycorma delicatula, family Fulgoridae.
□ Insects go through several stages, called instars, because they become adults. This nymph of a spotted lanternfly is at its 4th instar, and with two more molts, it will become an adult. If you are in the United States or Canada, be on the lookout for this insect, and report sightings to the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture here.
Photographed by: Chris Prinzivalli. Identified by: Dr. Mary Barbercheck and Dr. Julie Urban at Penn State. Location: Boyertown, Pike Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 22 July, 2017.
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Lantern Bug (Pyrops sultana)
Lantern bug, sometimes called a Lanternfly, Pyrops sultana, family Fulgoridae.
□ This lantern bug is large (see photographer’s note below.) Its long horn is very distinctive, and almost looks like an elephant nose! Although it is in the same family as the Spotted Lanternfly (posted elsewhere on this page), the Lantern Bug is not only in a separate species, but also a different genus.
Photographed and identified to order by: Paul Brent. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: near Labuan, Malaysian Borneo. Date: 30 June, 2019.
Paul says, “ I found this beauty on my ship about 10 miles offshore from Labuan, Malaysian Borneo....It was about 3-4 inches (7.6–10.1 cm) long, and flicked off the handrail to launch itself (rather than fly away).”
Lantern Bug (Pyrops candelaria)
Lantern bug, Pyrops candelaria, family Fulgoridae.
□ This lantern bug has a prominent white-spotted, red, upturned horn, and white-outlined yellow spots on green-veined forewings. Its hind wings, which are concealed under the forewings in this photo, are yellow, each with a wide black band at the tip. It feeds on plant sap.
□ Older scientific literature lists this species under the genus Fulgora: Fulgora candelaria.
Photographed by: Tony Cheng. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Maoming , Guangdong, China. Date: 4 November, 2019.
Tony says, “I saw a yellow-colored one when I was about 10 years old. That is 40 years ago. After that time, I couldn’t find it again. I thought they were become extinct. I am so happy to see them again.”
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Hopper nymph (possibly Fulgorid)
Hopper, nymph (immature), possibly in the family Fulgoridae.
□ The waxy secretions on this hopper nymph (immature) have curled up into a headdress worthy of a samba festival!
Photographed and identified to order by: Arkopal Gupta. Identified to possible family by: KnowYourInsects.org Location: Alipurduar, West Bengal, India. Date: 6 May, 2018. 
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Membracidae (the treehoppers and thorn bugs)

Oak Treehopper (Platycotis vittata)
Oak treehopper, Platycotis vittata, subfamily Membracinae, family Membracidae.
□ The oak treehopper has quite a bit of variation. The striped pattern and tall “horn” is common to many individuals (as shown here), but some lack the horn and some have a darker, grayish-brown background color that makes the red stripes difficult to see.
Photographed and identified to family by: Tonya Sexton. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Fish Hawk, Florida, USA. Date: 25 March, 2018.
Oak Treehopper (Platycotis vittata)
Oak treehopper, Platycotis vittata, subfamily Membracinae, family Membracidae.
□ This little oak treehopper looks like it is made up for a performance as a circus clown. It is quite a stunning bug, and one that few people ever see. This bug was actually hanging upside down, so the photos have been rotated to aid in visualizing it. The photo at right is a view of the insect head on.
Photographed by: J. P. Young. Identified to by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Sedona, Arizona, USA. Date: 15 May, 2020.
John says, “I found this guy on a flower in the garden today. I’ve never seen anything like it.... This was probably one of the coolest bugs I have ever seen!!”
Treehopper (Enchenopa spp.)
Treehopper nymph (immature) in the genus Enchenopa, subfamily Membracinae, family Membracidae.
□ This treehopper is one strange-looking insect! Like many other treehoppers, this one has a horn on its head (shown at upper left in the left-side photo), and nymphs of different species often have a fringe-ridge along their backs (close-up of the ridge shown in the photo at right).
Photographed by: Jill Schneider. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Lower Michigan, USA. Date: 22 June, 2019.
Jill says, “Found it on my neck while working under an oak in lower Michigan.”
Buffalo Leafhopper (Stictocephala bisonia)
Buffalo treehopper, nymph (immature), Stictocephala bisonia, subfamily Smiliinae, family Membracidae.
□ The humped back on this buffalo treehopper is indeed reminiscent of a buffalo! And notice that the scientific species name even has “bison” in it.
Photographed and identified by: Anonymous. Location: Adrian, Michigan, USA. Date: July, 2014.
Thorn Mimic Treehopper (Leptocentrus taurus)
Thorn mimic treehopper, also known as an eggplant horned planthopper, adult and nymphs, Leptocentrus taurus, subfamily Centrotinae, family Membracidae.
□ The adult thorn mimic treehopper (at left) has a two horn-shaped structures extending from its pronotum: one going upward and another sweeping back. The white stripe on each side is also characteristic of this species. (The other two hoppers in the photo are unidentified.)
Photographed by: Bhuvan Raj. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India. Date: 25 August, 2019.
Thorn Mimic Treehopper (Leptocentrus taurus)
Thorn mimic treehopper, also known as an eggplant horned planthopper, adult and nymphs, Leptocentrus taurus, subfamily Centrotinae, family Membracidae.
□ Presumably, this thorn mimic treehopper got its species name of taurus because of its long “bull” horns.
Photographed by: Bhuvan Raj. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India. Date: 21 May, 2020.
Two-Marked Treehopper (Enchenopa binotata)
Two-marked treehopper, Enchenopa binotata, subfamily Smiliinae, family Membracidae.
□ This is a screenshot taken from a video, but the two small light-colored markings are still visible on the back of this two-marked treehopper. The adult females walk along plant stems making slits in the stems and laying eggs just below the surface, and then covering them with froth, which provides a nice protected spot for the young to hatch.
Photographed by: Roger Koss. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Rochester, New York, USA. Date: 4 August, 2020.
Roger says, “Found this bug on my desk yesterday. Seems it fell from the ceiling, made a buzz, and caught my attention …then it got up, walked around and took off flying. I’ve never seen anything like it.”
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Cercopidae (the cercopid spittlebugs and froghoppers)

Froghopper (Leptataspis fruhstorferi)
Froghopper, Leptataspis fruhstorferi, subfamily Cercopinae, family Cercopidae.
□ This mating pair of froghoppers are quite stunning with the black wings and bright red head and pronotum (shield over the thorax). The top-view photos show the minimal veins for much of the length of the wings, but an intricate vein pattern toward the tips. The photo of the underside shows the large nose-like lump on the head.
Photographed by: Senrita Raksam Marak. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: William Nagar, Meghalaya, India. Date: 1 July, 2020.
Froghopper (Cercopidae)
Froghopper, family Cercopidae.
□ This froghopper really does resemble a frog ... except for the wings, of course.
Photographed by: Lisa Lair. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Unknown. Date: 17 August, 2020.
Two-lined spittlebug (Prosapia bicincta)
Two-lined spittlebug, Prosapia bicincta, subfamily Cercopinae, family Cercopidae.
□ This two-lined spittlebug has red stripes on its forewings, but in some individuals the stripes are orange — sometimes almost yellow. Spittlebugs typically hold their forewings closed over their backs, so the abdomen and the hind wings are hidden beneath the striped wings.
Photographed by: Jennifer Wiggins. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Memphis, Tennessee, USA. Date: 11 July, 2017.
Jennifer says, “Found it in my cat’s water bowl... Maybe 3/4 inch? Beautiful insect!”
Froghopper (Cosmoscarta dorsimacula)
Froghopper in the genus Cosmoscarta, perhaps Cosmoscarta dorsimacula, subfamily Cercopinae, family Cercopidae.
□ This spectacular froghopper is adorned with a flared pronotum (that shield-like, yellow area behind its head). A close look also reveals a couple of droplets on the leaf behind the insect — the froghopper eats copious amounts of plant sap, absorbs the nutrients from the sap, and excretes the excess fluid as droplets (aphids do the same thing). The excretion, called “honeydew,” is sweet.
Photographed by: Muhammad Amirul Zahil. Identified to genus by: Christopher H. Dietrich, Ph.D., a systematic entomologist with the Illinois Natural History Survey. Thank you, Dr. Dietrich! Location: The Habitat, Penang Hill, Malaysia. Date: 18 December, 2018.
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Aphrophoridae (the aphrophorid froghoppers and spittlebugs)
Clastopteridae (the clastopterid spittlebugs)

Meadow spittlebug (Philaenus spumarius)
Meadow spittlebug, sometimes called a Common Froghopper or Common Spittlebug, Philaenus spumarius, family Aphrophoridae.
□ The spittle part of the meadow spittlebug’s name refers to the frothy foam homes that the nymphs (immatures) make for themselves. The nymphs live within the foam until they transform into adults. Often, hikers will see many plant stems covered in small wads of foam that look very much like spit. Note: This genus was formerly listed as part of the Cercopidae family.
Photographed and identified by: Kelly McKinne (@gonzonaturalist). Location: Michigan, USA. Date: 10 August, 2012.
KnowYourInsects.org says, “Another beautiful close-up by Kelly!”
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Dogwood Spittlebug (Clastoptera proteus)
Dogwood spittlebug, Clastoptera proteus, family Clastopteridae.
□ The dogwood spittlebug has a characteristic yellow swipe of color on each side, as well as three narrow, yellow bands across its head and thorax. Many individuals in this species also have the yellow-encircled black spot at the far edge of each wing, as shown here.
Photographed by: Denise Rulason. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Mayville, Michigan, USA. Date: 9 July, 2017.

Cicadellidae (the leafhoppers)

Candy-Striped Leafhopper (Graphocephala coccinea)
Candy-striped leafhopper, also known as a Red-Banded Leafhopper, Graphocephala coccinea, subfamily Cicadellinae, family Cicadellidae.
□ With the wings outstretched on this beautiful candy-striped leafhopper, its vibrant abdomen is on display. As shown in the bottom photo, it is a tiny insect. The Candy-Striped Leafhopper is sometimes known by other common names, such as Scarlet-and-Green or Red-and-Blue Leafhopper.
Photographed by: Donna Croaker Hall. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Rouge Park, Detroit, Michigan, USA. Date: 23 October, 2014.
Candy-Striped Leafhopper (Graphocephala coccinea)
Candy-striped leafhopper, also known as a Red-Banded Leafhopper, Graphocephala coccinea, subfamily Cicadellinae, family Cicadellidae.
□ The candy-striped leafhopper typically sits like this — with its wings closed and showing off their vibrant red and teal stripes. The splashes of orange-yellow color on the thorax are a colorful bonus.
Photographed by: Cheryl Ellis. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Howell, Michigan, USA. Date: July, 2019.
Orange Sharpshooter (Bothrogonia addita)
Orange sharpshooter, Bothrogonia addita, subfamily Cicadellinae, family Cicadellidae.
□ This intensely colored orange sharpshooter has an interesting head shape. Note also the spots on its thorax, and the black tips on its wings. It found from India to southern China and south into the Indonesian islands.
Photographed by: Sony Suryawijaya. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Java Island, Indonesia. Date: 3 July, 2020.
Sony says, “The insect is approx. 2 cm in length.”
Broad-Headed Sharpshooter (Oncometopia orbona)
Broad-headed sharpshooter, Oncometopia orbona, subfamily Cicadellinae, family Cicadellidae.
□ This boldly colored broad-headed sharpshooter is quite large for a leafhopper: about a half inch (1.25 cm) long. The white spots on each wing are patches of a substance called brochosomes that are secreted by this species and other leafhoppers. The purpose of brochosomes is largely unknown, but some researchers suggest that they may repel the sticky plant sap that the leafhoppers eat and then excrete.
Photographed by: Josette Dugue. Nice job identifying the brochosome patches! Identified by: entomologist Michael Skvarla of Penn State Extension. Thank you, Dr. Skvarla! Location: Perkiomen Valley of southeastern Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 14 June, 2021.
Dr. Skvarla says that broad-headed sharpshooters can vector disease in grapes, but is not aware of diseases or damage to ornamental plants, “so they’sre not generally considered pests.”
Eared leafhopper (Ledra aurita)
Eared leafhopper, Ledra aurita, subfamily Ledrinae, family Cicadellidae.
□ The eared leafhopper has a distinctive shovel-shaped head, two projections on its pronotum that look almost like ears (as seen in the right-side photo above), and frills on the sides of its legs (evident in the center photo). Its green-gray color helps it blend in with lichen on the sides of trees, so it usually goes unnoticed. Entomologist Dr. George Poinar identified it, noting that it is “one of the most interesting and cutest of the frog hoppers.” He added that it is only known from the UK and northern Europe.
Photographed by: Hazel Cassel and Colby Mann. Identified by: entomologist George Poinar. Thank you, Dr. Poinar! Location: Hermitage, west Berkshire, UK. Date: 19 August, 2019.
Hazel says, “My son and I found this insect at our local park this morning.” She adds, “It’s been an amazing experience for us both discovering this beauty.... Colby absolutely loves discovering new things and for a mother to be learning with her child is an amazing journey.”
Four-spotted Clover Leafhopper (Agallia quadripunctata)
Four-spotted clover leafhopper, Agallia quadripunctata, subfamily Megophthalminae, family Cicadellidae.
□ The four-spotted clover leafhopper’s wings have a web of light-colored veins against a brown background.
Photographed by: Denise Rulason. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Mayville, Michigan, USA. Date: 16 June, 2018.
Leafhopper (Cicadellidae)
Leafhopper, nymph, family Cicadellidae.
Photographed and identified to family by: Thomas Langhans. See Thomas’s full-size image here. Location: San Bruno, county of San Mateo, California, USA. Date: 10 March, 2018.
Thomas says, “Every time I try to take a picture of something, a bug shows up! It is about 3 mm long.... The legs look like the legs of the black-faced leafhoppers.” (Note: 3 mm is about a tenth of an inch.)
Treehopper (Osbornellus spp.)
Treehopper in the genus Osbornellus, subfamily Deltocephalinae, family Cicadellidae.
□ The photographer has captured exquisite front, dorsal and ventral views of this beautifully patterned treehopper. The photographer says this little insect was just 5mm (0.2 inches) long.
Photographed and identified to family by: Thomas Langhans. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. See Thomas’s full-size images here, here, and here. Location: San Bruno, county of San Mateo, California, USA. Date: 4 August, 2020.
Thomas says, “Another bug that had no business in the kitchen!”
Leafhopper (Cicadellidae)
Leafhopper, family Cicadellidae.
Photographed and identified to family by: Thomas Langhans. See Thomas’s full-size images here and here. Location: San Bruno, county of San Mateo, California, USA. Date: 19 March, 2018.
Leafhopper (Tituria spp.)
Eared leafhopper in the genus Tituria, subfamily Ledrinae, family Cicadellidae.
□ This eared leafhopper has very angled appearance with its a triangular head, and a nearly triangular thorax with just a touch of reddish-brown at the outer edges. It also has red eyes, which in person, really stand out on this green leafhopper!
Photographed by: Senrita Raksam Marak. Identified by: systematic entomologist Christopher H. Dietrich of the a href='https://www.inhs.illinois.edu/' target='_blank'>Illinois Natural History Survey. Thank you, Dr. Dietrich! Location: William Nagar, Meghalaya, India. Date: 5 October, 2019.

Aphalaridae (the psyllids and jumping plant lice)

Jumping Plant Louse, Pachypsylla spp.
Jumping plant louse, probably in the genus Pachypsylla, subfamily Pachypsyllinae, family Aphalaridae.
□ The jumping plant louse is not related to human lice, but it does jump. Its tiny size and its leaping ability cause some people to mistake them for fleas.
Photographed by: Tracey Finkbeiner. Identified by: Christopher H. Dietrich, Ph.D., a systematic entomologist with the Illinois Natural History Survey. Location: East Providence, Rhode Island, Michigan, USA. Date: 5 November, 2017.
Tracey provided this description: “It looks like a miniature cicada. It has membranous wings and is wedge-shaped. They don’t seem to fly, just jump. They are smaller than the tip of a ball-point pen.”
Hackberry Psyllid, Pachypsylla spp.
Hackberry Psyllid in the genus Pachypsylla, subfamily Pachypsyllinae, family Aphalaridae.
□ The tiny hackberry psyllid is also known as a jumping plant louse (no relation to human lice!). These insects cause small roung lumps, called galls, to form on the leaves of common hackberry trees (Celtis occidentalis). Galls are rather like benign tumors in that they are an overgrowth of plant tissue: The female psyllid lays an egg on a leaf and injects a little fluid in the process, and this triggers the plant to form the gall (examples here and here). The gall serves as a great spot for the soon-to-hatch larva to find shelter and food (usually the gall tissue is quite nutrient-rich) until it can eventually become an adult and head off on its own. See the comment below.
Photographed by: Eddie Kytia. Identified by: systematic entomologist Christopher H. Dietrich of the Illinois Natural History Survey. Thank you, Dr. Dietrich! Location: Sayreville, New Jersey, USA. Date: 21 October, 2020.
Eddie says, “They are literally about 1-3mm long for the last 2 or 3 years they have been bad! All over my window and balcony door screens. Soon as I open a window or balcony door, they are all over the curtains. They are so small I thought they were fleas because to the eye they look black and ... they jump like a flea.”

Flatidae (the flatid leafhoppers)

Planthopper nymph, Flatormenis proxima
Northern flatid planthopper, Flatormenis proxima, family Flatidae.
□ The big eyes and “snub-nosed” face make this northern flatid planthopper a rather adorable little creature.
Photographed by: Elizabeth Boyle. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: West Milford, New Jersey, USA. Date: 23 August, 2017.
Elizabeth says, “I spotted this lovely creature on the railing of my steps.... The color is beautiful!”
Planthoppers, Ormenoides venusta
Flatid planthoppers, Ormenoides venusta, family Flatidae.
□ This species of flatid planthoppers has just the vaguest hint of orange at the edges of its wings — the slight orange tinge is visible in the planthopper at right.
Photographed by: J. Graham. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Noble County, Indiana, USA. Date: 9 August, 2019.
Planthoppers, Siphanta spp.
Flatid planthopper in the genus Siphanta, family Flatidae.
□ This typical pose of a flatid planthopper shows off the sharp upsweep of its forewings.
Photographed and identified as a planthopper by: Isabella Summers. Identified to genus by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Warrawee, New South Wales, Australia. Date: 2 December, 2019.
Hopper nymph (possibly Flatid)
Hopper, nymph (immature), possibly in the family Flatidae.
□ The waxy secretions from the rear end of this hopper nymph (immature) look almost like two fuzzy, white tails.
Photographed by: Arkopal Gupta. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org Location: Alipurduar, West Bengal, India. Date: 6 July, 2019. 
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Acanaloniidae (acanaloniid planthoppers)
Ricaniidae (the ricaniid planthoppers)

Planthopper nymph, Acanalonia conica
Green coneheaded planthopper, Acanalonia conica, family Acanaloniidae.
□ The green coneheaded planthopper sticks its beak-like mouthparts into plants like wild grape, goldenrod and milkweeds, which are very common in far southeastern Michigan where this photo was taken. They will also dine on some crops that are typical in this region of Michigan.
Photographed by: Megan Rabideau. Spotted by Megan’s 4-year-old son Nolan. Good job, Nolan! Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: far southeastern Michigan near the Ohio border, USA. Date: 23 August, 2017.
Megan says Nolan is “happy to know more about his ‘new buggy friend.’”
Planthopper, Acanalonia conica
Green coneheaded planthopper, Acanalonia conica, family Acanaloniidae.
□ The gorgeous lime-green color is perfect for keeping the green coneheaded planthopper hidden along plant leaves. Both the “hopper” and “coneheaded” parts of its name are fitting — its head looks like the bottom of an ice cream cone, and this little insect hops from leaf to leaf. It is a tiny insect, reaching only about a quarter of an inch (6 mm) long.
Photographed and identified to superfamily by: Victor Leverenz. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Dryden, Michigan, USA. Date: 31 August, 2019.
Victor says, “This seems to be a leafhopper or planthopper. Anyway, it looks like a leaf-mimic to me.” KnowYourInsects.org says, “ Right you are on both counts: It’s a planthopper that is a good approximation of a leaf!”
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Planthopper (Ricania spp.)
Ricaniid planthopper in the genus Ricania, subfamily Ricaniinae, family Ricaniidae.
□ The very unusual-looking ricaniid planthoppers in this family (Ricaniidae) have spectacular butterfly-like wings that flare out to the sides. The head, however, gives away its identity as a planthopper.
□ Some members of this genus are polyphagous, which means they eat a wide variety of plants. One of the best-known species in this genus, Ricania speculum, is considered a pest of garden and crop plants, and is now spreading from its native southeastern Asia into Europe.
Photographed by: Rituparna Banik. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Maharaja Bir Bikram College, Agartala, Tripura, India. Date: 12 April, 2017.

Issidae (the issid planthoppers)
Tropiduchidae (the tropiduchid planthoppers)

Planthopper nymph (Issus spp.)
Planthopper, nymph (immature), likely genus Issus, family Issidae.
□ The tufts extending from the rear end of this planthopper are actually waxy filaments that the planthoppers are able to spout. The filaments can become quite large and bushy, and help to hide the insect from predators.
Photographed by: Wim Ridder. Identified to genus by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Kockengen, the Netherlands. Date: 27 May, 2015.
Wim says, “This small insect (3mm) jumped on my book, in my garden, at 15.44 h. People of the Dutch organisation Waarneming.nl wrote me that it probably is a specimen (nymph) of Auchenorrhyncha. Photos on your site show me that they may be right.”
Planthopper nymph (Issus spp.)
Planthopper, nymph (immature), likely genus Issus, family Issidae.
□ This immature planthopper has a quite intricate pattern of dark markings on its thorax and abdomen, and it has produced a neat little tuft of waxy filaments at its rear end.
Photographed by: Alessio Zagaria. Identified to genus by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: London, England, UK. Date: 6 May, 2020.
Alessio found it in the back garden.”
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Grainy Planthopper (Kallitaxila granulata)
Planthopper, possibly grainy planthopper, Kallitaxila granulata, subfamily Tropiduchinae, family Tropiduchidae.
□ This lime-green planthopper has rounded wings that fan out from the body, giving the silhouette a rather heart-shaped appearance. Its wings have tiny, grain-like spots (seen here in one of the wings), and is tentatively identified as a grainy planthopper (Kallitaxila granulata), but see the comment below.
Kallitaxila granulata is native to southeastern Asia, but has made its way to Hawaii, where this photo was taken.
Photographed by: Christian Moratin. Identified to family by: systematic entomologist Christopher H. Dietrich of the a href='https://www.inhs.illinois.edu/' target='_blank'>Illinois Natural History Survey. Thank you, Dr. Dietrich! Identified to tentative species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Heeia, Oahu, Hawaii. Date: 26 May, 2020.
Dr. Dietrich says, “There are several tropical genera with this same general appearance.”

Eurybrachidae (the eurybrachid planthoppers)
Delphacidae (the delphacid planthoppers)

Dardus Wattle Hopper nymph (Dardus abbreviatus)
Dardus wattle hopper, nymph (immature), Dardus abbreviatus, family Eurybrachidae.
□ Although only one of its waxy terminal filaments (its “tails”) is visible in this photo, this nymph of a dardus wattle hopper actually has two. To see a photo of the adult, which has a red belly, click here. Both the adult and the nymph have a tiny horn protruding under each eye (one can be seen in this photo). They are often found on acacia trees.
Photographed by: Paula Fragar. Identified to genus by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Blue Mountains, New South Wales, Australia. Date: 1 March, 2020.
Planthopper (Eurybrachis tomentosa)
Planthopper, Eurybrachis tomentosa, subfamily Eurybrachyinae, family Eurybrachidae.
□ With an ivory and deep-green pattern, this eurybrachid planthopper is a show-stopper. When it sits still on a moss-covered branch, however, the pattern provides excellent camouflage and it nearly disappears into the background. It does, however, have a red thorax hiding beneath its wings — similar in color to its eyes.
Photographed by: Bhuvan Raj. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India. Date: 23 February, 2020.
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Taro planthopper (Tarophagus colocasiae)
Taro planthopper, Tarophagus colocasiae, subfamily Delphacinae, family Delphacidae.
The photographer spotted these taro planthoppers on taro — often, the plant is very helpful in identification! See his comments below. The photos show a nymph (left) and adult.
To learn more about these insects and see additional photos, click here (University of Florida).
Photographed by: Christian Moratin. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Kapolei, Hawaii. Date: 29 April, 2021.
Christian says, “I found these at the base of taro plants (a staple crop here in Hawaii).... It was cool to watch it move: instead of turning its head left and then moving like how most insects do, this insect kept its head straight and moved much like a spider or a crab.”

Unknown Hoppers

Hopper Nymph (Auchenorrhyncha)
Unknown hopper nymph.
□ This nymph is one of the hoppers, but KnowYourInsects.org cannot identify which family from this photo. It shows the waxy tuft that is common to several families of Hoppers.
Photographed by: Nikki Donahue. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Tampa, Florida, USA. Date: 25 April, 2018.
Nikki says, “Found this tiny guy on my couch.”
Hopper Nymph (Auchenorrhyncha)
Unknown hopper nymph.
□ This nymph is one of the hoppers, but KnowYourInsects.org cannot identify which family from this photo. Several families of Hoppers have the waxy tuft seen in this photo.
Photographed by: Stephanie Donnelly Holden. Submitted by: Stephanie’s mother. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Oxford, Massachusetts, USA. Date: 25 July, 2018.
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Psyllidae (the jumping plant lice)

Acacia Psyllid (Acizzia spp.)
Jumping plant louse, quite possibly an acacia psyllid in the genus Acizzia, family Psyllidae.
□ As wonderfully described by identifier and biologist Emilie Bess, jumping plant lice, such as this one, differ from the similar-looking psocids in their means of locomotion and body shape. She says, “My best tool for distinguishing them in the field is simply to see if they jump away when approached — psyllids jump, psocids don’t. Up close, the psyllid has a triangular body shape that resembles a cicada, whereas psocids have three very distinct body segments like a cootie bug toy.“
□ This is tentatively identified as an acacia psyllid, but the only way to be certain would require a look at the male genitalia.
Photographed by: Thomas Langhans. See his full-size photo (plus additional views), here and here. Identified to tentative species by: biologist (and artist) Emilie Bess. Thank you, Dr. Bess! Location: San Bruno, county of San Mateo, California, USA. Date: 7 May, 2021.
Thomas says it is “about 2 mm from the face to the end of the wings.”
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Aphidae (the aphids)

Aphids (Aphididae)
Aphids, family Aphididae.
Aphids have an interesting relationship with ants. Aphids suck up lots of sweet plant juices and their waste products are also sweet. In fact, their waste products are called honeydew! Ants love sweet things and will congregate among the aphids so they can eat up the aphids’ honeydew.
Photographed by: Milosh Rankovic. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Ontario, Canada. Date: 12 October, 2016.
Milosh says, “They are gathering in the corner of the outside wall and garden door. Looks to me, they are looking for some warmer place.... Temperatures are getting colder — about 5C — during the night.”
Woolly Aphids (Eriosomatinae)
Woolly aphids, subfamily Eriosomatinae, family Aphididae.
Woolly aphids are sometimes called fairyflies or angelflies, and it is easy to see why with that cottony white covering! Actually, the “cotton” is a collection of wax filaments.
Photographed by: Janvier Petto. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: northeastern Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 19 July, 2017.
Janvier says, “They were all over hostas and no more than 1/2" long (if that).”
Milkweed Aphids (Aphis nerii)
Milkweed aphids, also known as oleander aphids, Aphis nerii, subfamily Eriosomatinae, family Aphididae.
□ These photos show both winged and wingless milkweed aphids on a milkweed plant. The aphids’ bodies are orange except for the black legs and small black cornicles extending from either side of the rear of the abdomen.
Photographed by: Denise Devynck. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Utah Valley Permaculture Classroom Gardens and Greenhouse, USA. Date: 4 September, 2020.
Aphids (Aphididae) and Seven-Spot Ladybug
Aphids, family Aphididae.
□ Ladybug larvae are major predators of aphids. In this photo, the larva of a seven-spot ladybug (also known as seven spot ladybird beetle) is dining on a few aphids. Aphids can become pests on plants, so gardeners sometimes purchase ladybug eggs or larvae to reduce aphid populations.
Photographed by: Thomas Langhans. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. See Thomas’s full-size image here. Location: San Bruno, county of San Mateo, California, USA. Date: 12 March, 2018.
Aphids (Aphididae)
Aphids, family Aphididae.
□ This is a closeup of some of the aphids shown in the previous photo. Note the cornicles, which are the small tubes that extend from the end of the abdomen. The cornicles secrete fluid that is distasteful to many of an aphid’s predators, so it serves a protective function.
Photographed by: Thomas Langhans. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. See Thomas’s full-size image here. Location: San Bruno, county of San Mateo, California, USA. Date: 12 March, 2018.
Aphid (Aphididae)
Aphid, family Aphidae.
□ Some species of aphids, like the one shown here, have wings, while others are wingless. All have two short “tails”, which are appendages correctly called cerci.
Photographed by: Daisy Rulz. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Mayville, Michigan, USA. Date: 24 September, 2017.
Aphid
Aphid, family Aphidae.
□ This aphid has especially long cornicles (the two straight structures extending from either side of its rear end).
Photographed by: Matt Darch. Location: Kingston, Ontario, Canada. Date: 15 October, 2020.
Matt found this aphid on a pillowcase, and snapped the photo with his cellphone and a snap-on magnifier. Nicely done, Matt!
Aphids (Aphididae) and Seven-Spot Ladybug
Aphids, family Aphididae.
□ This is a top view of the aphid in the previous photos.
Photographed by: Thomas Langhans. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. See Thomas’s full-size image here. Location: San Bruno, county of San Mateo, California, USA. Date: 17 March, 2018.
Thomas says, “The wings have a long black stripe centered on the leading edge of the wing that does not extend all the way to the wing root or tip.”
Aphids
Aphids, family Aphididae.
□ Some spectacular macro photography led to these two close-ups of aphids.
Photographed by: Thomas Langhans. See Thomas’s full-size images here and here. Location: San Bruno, county of San Mateo, California, USA. Date: 30 March, 2018.
Aphid (Aphididae)
Aphid, family Aphididae.
Aphids come is several shapes, but one feature they all share is the two tiny projections toward the rear of the abdomen. The projections are called cornicles or siphunculi.
Photographed by: Matt Dudley. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: San Francisco, California, USA. Date: 30 December, 2019.
Matt found a big collection of these aphids on his house one day.”
Aphids (Aphididae)
Aphids, family Aphididae.
□ Most people see only the wingless aphids. Depending on the species, some aphids reproduce sexually (with a male and female involved), some reproduce asexually (no need for males), and some will switch between asexual and sexual reproducingreproduction depending on environmental factors, such as availability of food or temperature.
Photographed by: Teodor Ion. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Bucharest, Romania. Date: 21 December, 2019.
Aphids (Aphididae) and Seven-Spot Ladybug
Aphids, family Aphididae.
□ Although many aphids are wingless, some have wings, as shown here. See the photographer’s excellent description below. The body length on the aphids in this photo is about 2 mm. Both photos show the underside of the aphid.
Photographed by: Thomas Langhans. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. See Thomas’s full-size images here and here. Location: San Bruno, county of San Mateo, California, USA. Date: 17 March, 2018.
Thomas says, “I was watching them with a stereo microscope. They get ready to fly by rotating the wings forward, straight up, then spreading them apart about 45° on each side, then taking off. There is a slight pause at each position. Kind of neat.”
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Aleyrodidae (the whiteflies)
Monophlebidae (the giant scale insects)

Greenhouse Whitefly, Trialeurodes vaporariorum
Greenhouse whitefly, Trialeurodes vaporariorum, subfamily Aleyrodinae, family Aleyrodidae.
□ This greenhouse whitefly was photographed — appropriately — in a greenhouse at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Uvalde. It was on a watermelon plant. Check out the comment below about how the photographer snapped such a great closeup of this tiny insect.
Photographed and identified by: Manzeal Khanal. Nice job, Manzeal! Location: Uvalde, Texas, USA. Date: 17 October, 2019.
Manzeal says, “It is magnified using a microscope, and I used a mobile phone on top of the eyepiece to capture the image.”
Add your photo here!
Add your photo here!
Cottony cushion scale (Icerya purchasi)
Cottony cushion scale, female, Icerya purchasi, family Monophlebidae.
□ The female cottony cushion scale, shown here, has a brownish-orange body, but she is nearly covered by her white, ridged egg sac that can contain up to 800 eggs. The female with the egg sac can be a half inch (1.2 cm) long. These insects release a great deal of a sweet liquid known as honeydew, which attracts ants (as seen here). For more information about these insects, click here.
Photographed by: Carlo Castoro. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: St. Thomas, U. S. Virgin Islands. Date: 17 November, 2019.

Coccidae (the scale insects)

Calico scale insect (Eulecanium cerasorum)
Calico scale insect, Eulecanium cerasorum, family Coccidae.
Calico scale insects are usually seen on the sides of certain trees, including maples, elms, dogwoods, and a variety of stone fruits (e.g., plums, cherries, peaches, and nectarines). They produce a sticky substance, called honeydew, which is a breeding ground for a black fungus. For more information about these insects, click here.
Photographed by: Brian Carpenter. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Washington, USA. Date: 20 May, 2017.
Brian says, “My family member in Washington state has found these all over her walnut tree.”
Calico scale insect (Eulecanium cerasorum)
Calico scale insects, Eulecanium cerasorum, family Coccidae.
Calico scale insects were introduced into San Francisco, California, about a century ago, and have spread through the western United States. More recently, they’ve also moved into a few eastern states, with the first reports in Michigan (where this photo was taken) coming from the far southern part of the state in around 2007.
Photographed by: Lynn Gorgas. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Allen Park, Michigan, USA. Date: 15 May, 2018.
Lynn found these on her Japanese maple.
Barnacle scale insect (Ceroplastes cirripediformis)
Barnacle scale insects, Ceroplastes cirripediformis, family Coccidae.
Barnacle scale insects live in aggregations on stems, as shown in the bottom photo. They often become infested with parasitoid wasps — the wasps lay eggs in the soft bodies of the Barnacle Scale Insects, the eggs hatch inside and when they mature, tiny wasps fly out of the scale insects.
Photographed by: K J Westman. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Sri Landa. Date: 25 August, 2018.
K J says, “They are very symmetric and will in some places totally cover the stem they are living on.”
Soft scale insect (Coccidae)
Soft scale insects in the family Coccidae.
□ This soft scale insect is about half the side of the fingernail on a pinky finger. Dr. Allen Smith-Pardo, who identified it, said the genus can be determined only with a closer look at the specimen itself.
Photographed by: Wasana Niyomdecha. Identified by: USDA entomologist Allen Smith-Pardo. Thank you Dr. Smith-Pardo! Location: Hatyai, Thailand. Date: 2019.
Wasana says, “I took photos of this little guy when I was having lunch at one local kitchen in Hatyai, Thailand.”


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Unless noted otherwise, photographs on this website are the property of the photographers and may not be reused without written permission from the photographers. To obtain permission, request it here.

Photos at the top of this website are (from left to right): potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) — photo credit: Scott Bauer, U.S. Department of Agriculture; ebony jewelwing (Calopteryx maculata)— photo credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; sweat bee (Agapostemon splendens) — photo credit: Natalie Allen and Stephanie Kolski, U.S. Geological Survey; preying mantis, monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus), hellgrammite (aka toe biter) larva and eyed click beetle (Alaus oculatus) — photo credit: Leslie Mertz; Halloween pennant (Celithemis eponina) — photo credit: Kay Meng, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

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